Potted

budget. i hate that word. my financial methodology is more along the lines of “try to be sensible and then hope for the best.” i’m not a planner by any means. i don’t, for instance,  make lists when i go to the grocery store (that’s why all those tins of stuffed olives keep cropping up in the fridge.) but, i do keep the financial lessons learnt from my parents fresh in my mind – my mom still has her little notebooks where she wrote down every single thing they spent money on as a young couple starting out. they even made their own beer. how’s that for thrifty, eh?

the reason i’m talking about budgets is because i want to make my home look a little bit nicer. but how! right now i’m living with my two friends who are similarly budget minded, and we’re trying to deal with a dining room that is sparse and empty. “maybe we should put some art on the walls” – we muse. actually, that is a good idea (my bedroom already has nil wall space left due to this.) but you know what else is a good idea? PLANTS.

i am a bit obsessed with the idea of indoor plants right now. anyone have tips for venturing into this territory? nice plants that won’t die too easily… succulents? i do love the look of them, but also don’t want our place to look like a desert garden conservatory (or do i?) also we don’t get an awful lot of sunlight in most of the flat unfortunately, so i think our future plants would have to be okay with that.

botany factory

the selby

old brand new

{joojoo}

old faithful shop

old chum

the brick house

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The Bootstrap Project

i received a lovely email from maxine telling me about the bootstrap projectan organization she founded after travelling through swaziland in the summer of 2009, where she was inspired by artisan thembekile tsabedre’s hand crafted wooden platters (which are now sold out on their website.)

the bootstrap project’s mission is to create a sustainable platform to promote and retain centuries-old crafts and customs. we create the outlet for the local artisans. the proceeds of the sales go back to the artists and their communities, through our development partners, to empower them by providing the education and opportunity to retain, preserve and advance their fast-dying crafts, customs and way of life. by purchasing through bootstrap you allow artisans—who act as the catalyst for their whole communities—to end their own poverty. it’s trade not aid.

ps: if you’ve sent me an email recently please be patient, i’m currently playing a game of catch with my inbox

5

origami animals. origanimals.

i can picture an arrangement of origami animals by south african origami artist quentin trollip on a table somewhere in my house. that would be magic. these have been designed & folded from a single uncut square of paper (where the animals have more than one colour two pieces are MC’d together)

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Ellen Rogers

ellen rogers is a london based photographer fashion photographer. through her work, rogers creates timeless dream worlds where temptresses seduce and lure you into unknown, dark lands. a firm believer in the art of analogue photography, rogers does not utilize any digital equipment or computer based manipulation (other than scanning the end result) and has developed most techniques through experimentation with traditional darkroom processes.

unbelievable. it’s almost difficult to believe that no photoshop was involved. see more at her website, flickr and blog.

all photographs by ellen rogers

7

Coffee & cats

keep having this crazy thought that i should be cutting down on my coffee consumption. bah! life’s too short not to be caffeinated. then i discovered seth restaino’s photographs, which illustrate that theory beautifully (plus cats)

i’m also quite intrigued by that chemex coffee maker (“designed by a german born chemist and based on laboratory glass vessels”) – even though i already abuse a variety of methods to make my own … espresso machine, stove top moka, french press … anybody have a chemex? any good?

all photographs by seth restaino

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