The Red Dress

today’s guest post is from Mallory of Where The Lovely Things are. we share a love of many things, but we really bonded over our shared love of Melvin Udall in As Good as it Gets.


I’m Mallory (I mostly blog here, but also here & here, plus I tweet & pin) & every season I’m compelled to at least glance at every designer’s collection who presents during fashion week. I have no reason to do this (thus why it’s a compulsion). Do I work in fashion? No. At a magazine? Nope. Could I ever hope to buy something from a collection? Ha! Yes, I sometimes blog about my favorites, but I don’t look at the collections because I’m going to blog about them, I blog about them because I spent all that freaking time clicking through each look. I think – “I might as well throw together few posts. Don’t totally waste hours of your life, Mal”.

A week or so ago I lay in some sort of zombie-daze state looking through collection after collection and I realized that I got a little jolt of excitement every time I found an awesome red dress. I realized (or at least I tried to convince myself) that that was why I ended up scrolling through all these fashion fests when I should be sleeping: I’m looking for red dresses. Because I looooooove red dresses.

When I was a little girl and my mother dressed me, red dresses were always prevalent. When I started dressing myself they cropped up just as much. My favorite dresses I ever wore to dances in high school – red. If I’d been invited to the Oscars I’d have worn the color of the carpet. And when I get married someday I may wear white, but only for a little bit (if at all) then it’ll be… yeah – red.

So, for this guest post I thought I’d put together some of my favorite red dresses from the Fall 2012 ready-to-wear collections as well as some of my favorite red dresses from movies (because I love movies as much as I love red dresses). Here we go…

Felder Felder / See by Chloé / Imitation of Christ / Emilia Wickstead

Mélanie Laurent as Shosanna in Inglorious Basterds

Karen Walker / Monique Lhuillier / Jonathan Saunders / Calvin Klein Collection

Alicia Silverstone as Cher in Clueless

Matthew Williamson / Michael Kors / Marchesa

Grace Kelly as Margot in Dial M for Murder

Thakoon / Jonathan Saunders / Michael van der Ham / Christopher Kane

Stockard Channing as Rizzo in Grease

St. John / Tadashi Shoji / Monique Lhuillier / Sachin + Babi

Nicole Kidman as Satine in Moulin Rouge

Sophie Theallet / Monique Lhuillier / Imitation of Christ / Monique Lhuillier

Marilyn Monroe as Lorelei and Jane Russell as Dorothy in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Emilia Wickstead / Reed Krakoff / Jil Sander

Julie Andrews as Mary Poppins in (obvs.) Mary Poppins

Finally, I had to include Helen Hunt as Carol in As Good As It Gets because one of the reasons Diana is awesome (other than her amazing blog) is her ability to recognize quotes / references from this movie. I’ve encountered few people who know what I mean when I say “Good times, noodle salad”, so I totally appreciate when I find someone who does. Sadly for Carol the Waitress, Melvin insults her lovely red dress when they go out on their date. But then to make it up to her he tells her “You make me want to be a better man” and she says it’s the best compliment of her life, so it’s all okay. For a few minutes, at least.

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Food & Art

ooooh you’re in for a treat! regular readers will be familiar with catherine of wolf eyebrows (if you guys don’t read her blog already, you should). i have said this before but sometimes i think cath is my blog twin, we have very similar tastes in almost everything. she’s put together a visual comparison treat for you – check out some of her other art & food posts here and here and make sure to follow catherine on twitter & pinterest. she also blogs for Nice Work which is an excellent inspirational resource for designers or anyone into all things creative.


Some of you may know that Diana and I run a tumblr dedicated to the most important meal of the day: breakfast. So when I was asked to contribute a guest post to this wonderful blog my mind immediately wandered to all things culinary.

Since Diana is the queen of artistic and aesthetic comparisons, I decided to create a series of visual comparisons that marry my love of food with my appreciation for art. I hope they satisfy your eyes and your stomachs.

A Dinner Table at Night by John Singer Sargent / Cranberry White Chocolate Tarts / Roasted Apple Pie for One / Portrait with Apples by August Macke

Club Sandwich / Holyday by James Tissot / The Milk Maid by Winslow Homer / Hot Fudge Bourbon Milkshake

The Cheese Vendor by Edouard-Jean Dambourgez / Cheese Souffle / French-pressed Coffee Ice Cream / Blue Enamel Coffeepot, Earthenware and Fruit by Vincent van Gogh

Salmon and Quinoa with Toasted Seeds / The Poor Fisherman by Pierre Puvis de Chavannes / Detail from The Infant Jesus Distributing Bread to Pilgrims by Bartolome Esteban Murillo / Roti

Thanks for having me Diana!

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Fashion Month Favourites

as you’ll see in her disclaimer (haha) kate does not actually work in fashion – but you might think she does considering that she occasionally styles mini-editorials, frequently updates her fashion-fueled tumblr, contributes to wearing the pants and writes cool pieces for local blog it’s what i’m into (including a Q&A with current  street style it-girl eleonora carisi). we often gab on gchat and twitter, she’s an absolute favourite.


I should probably start off with a disclaimer: I know nothing about fashion. Except that I look at it. A lot. I’ve been working on this post for about a week, actually, maybe two. And with every day and every show it gets more and more difficult to edit myself. There’ve been a ton of collections with stuff I would wear (let’s face it I’m not one to turn down designer gear), but if it’s made it onto this list it means I really liked it. And when I say “really liked it” I mean it filled my heart with pure, unadulterated fashion joy! In keeping with Miss Moss’ fashion week rules, I have decided to limit myself to 4 outfits per collection, because otherwise things would get crazay. So, here we go!

Prada

I am a huge fan of Miuccia Prada. In fact, I may name my future daughter Miuccia (even though I have no idea how to pronounce it), that’s how cool I think she is. I mean, the lady was born in 1949, but season after season she creates these fresh, unimaginable women. A little bit classy. A little bit quirky. Always left of centre.This season’s eccentricity came in the form of an army of bad-ass steam punk villians. It was like Dr Evil meets Willy Wonka. Purple, green, tan, yellow & orange sat side by side in perfect harmony. Even the black ensembles didn’t bore. Miuccia, ti amo!

Carven

Fashion and art collide on the runway with a collection that, according to vogue.com, was “borne of the fantasy of a girl walking through a museum filled with sixteenth and seventeenth century art and stealing things off the wall and out of the display cases for her wardrobe”. I like that. A lot. The first time I saw this collection, I literally started chanting “Carven! Carven! Carven!” in my head. I went all tingly inside and I couldn’t breathe. It was very strange and I’m a bit worried about my mental health. I think I went temporarily crazy for Carven.

Proenza Schouler

Personally I don’t think liking Proenza Schouler needs any explanation. Have you seen how cute they are? Dream-boat designer boys aside, I thought their Fall collection was pretty cool. At first, I just liked the hair. But the closer I looked, the more I liked. In fact, I think one of those satin Asian inspired padded jackets has punched its way up to the top of my Dream-On Fall 2012 Wishlist. (You can throw in the sweaters too).

Marc by Marc Jacobs

Marc’s collection fulfilled all my schoolgirl fashion fantasies. Although undoubtedly the least flattering skirt length ever, I couldn’t help but fall in love with his prim & proper, post-war appeal; complete with it’s very own technicolour dream kilt.

Sonia Rykiel

Sonia Rykiel’s collection appeals to the part of me that wishes I dressed like a grown up. Or a lady. Or a grown-up lady. Super chic knits graced the runway in cream, a colour I would never dare to wear because of my tendency to spill things on myself. The black headbands added a cool flapper charm and kept the luxe looks from taking themselves too seriously.

Marni

Marni was back with a Bang! (Hair Pun!) I’m not gonna lie, the white tights threw me a bit. They reminded me of the medical kind you have to wear to keep varicose veins under control… I think they call them compression stockings? Anyway, back to the runway… I love the combo of red and baby blue, and the fact that the red came in the form of a cape to rival all capes was an added bonus. The embellished tee & matching bag was a feast for the eyes. And #3  reminds me of a colouring book slash pajamas, which looks super fun to me.

Kenzo

Kenzo, so cool. I know it’s sad, but that’s all I can think of when I look at the Fall collection that was worn by the 50 models who travelled up and down escalators in a 4-storey high building for the audience at Paris Fashion Week. Tiger print sweaters tucked into satin column skirts. Tasseled shirts & skirts that turn to armour. Tablecloth prints and monochrome clashes. It’s bold, without being ridiculous and totally 100% wearable, if you’re that way inclined.

So I think I’m done. And, as this was a completely subjective look at Fall 2012, I encourage you to head on over to vogue.com to check out all the collections and pick your own favourites!

Images via Vogue

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L’amour Fou

as i mentioned in my post a week ago Mariah blogs over at Quite Continental, and i was thrilled when she sent me this post because one of my favourite things to delve into at her blog are stories of great loves – you also need to read her post about Winston Churchill & Clementine Hozier.


In February, my mind frequently turns to great love stories: stories of grand gestures, of passions that burned brightly and then out, of couples that stayed together for years, of couples that could not live without each other.  Coincidentally, I finally saw L’amour Fou this month, a documentary detailing the 50 year relationship of Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé, and the record-breaking auction of their massive collection of art and objet d’art that ultimately totaled €342m in sales.

A heart-breaking, quietly mournful story, you easily glean a sense of how hard a man Saint Laurent was to love and the fact that Bergé never stopped loving him.  At the time of Saint Laurent’s death, the two had actually been separated for some years, but married a few days prior to Saint Laurent’s passing, in a final symbolic gesture of their relationship: Bergé would be left to handle the tidying up the details of their long partnership and life together.

“I remember your first collection under your name and the tears at the end. Then the years passed. Oh, how they passed quickly. The divorce was inevitable but the love never stopped.

I don’t know how to say good-bye because I can never leave you. We will never watch a sunset together again. We will never share the emotions together before a painting again. Someday I will join you under the palm trees of Morocco. 

I want to tell you my admiration, my profound respect and my love.” 

Bergé at the funeral of Saint Laurent

Yves Saint Laurent became an apprentice to Christian Dior at the age of 18, and became the head of the fashion house at the age of 21 when Dior suddenly died in 1958.  In 1960, Saint Laurent and Bergé founded the fashion house that bears the Saint Laurent’s name, which is where he would design his tuxedo or “Le Smoking” for women and many memorable collections.  But by 1976, Saint Laurent and Bergé had ended their romantic relationship.  Remarkably, they remained business partners and close friends.

One of their most special places can be found in Marrakesh, Morocco: the Jardin Majorelle.  A botanical garden that dates back to the colonial period when Morocco was a protectorate of France in the 1920s, it was designed by French expat Jacques Majorelle and was a favorite place of Bergé and Saint Laurent.  Open to the public since 1947, when the garden was in danger of being purchased and converted into a hotel in 1980, Bergé and Saint Laurent simply purchased it so that it could remain a public place.  Their foundation maintains it to this day.  After his death, Saint Laurent’s ashes were scattered in their beloved garden.  Bergé will one day join him.

L’amour Fou is an exceptionally well-done documentary that examines one of the greatest names in modern fashion through the eyes of the man who loved him fiercely in life and now mourns him quietly in death.  It traces their relationship from the first painting they bought together to their first trip to Morocco to the last fall of the auctioneer’s gavel.  I cannot recommend it enough and I hope one day soon I will walk through their bright blue garden in Morocco.

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Lover’s Eyes

Alison of Teenangster always discovers the most amazing jewellery, which she often shares on her blog, pinterest and twitter. so i was excited when she sent me this post about Lover’s Eyes. jewellery with a story, my favourite.


So, I’m a bit of an antique jewelry fiend. Ever since I got engaged, it’s only gotten worse; I now spend way too much time hovering on eBay and Etsy vintage, seeking out gray seed pearls, an engraved band from the 1930s, European-cut diamonds, mourning jewelry. You name it, I’m watching it.

And then I found out about lover’s eyes: hand-painted portraits on ivory which were popular in England between the 1780s and 1830s. What a game changer! My love of eyes, art and jewelry, united in one convenient, covetable form.

So, the history of this jewelry style is as juicy as the paintings are gorgeous. Since romantic love didn’t typically exist within the confines of a marriage at this point in history, affairs were pretty common. So how would you show your loyalty to your lover? By wearing a sentimental portrait of an unidentifiable part of their person, of course.

According to the Smithsonian, “One of the earliest known eye miniatures was painted in 1786 by the English artist Richard Cosway for the Prince of Wales, later King George IV. The miniature showed the eye of Mrs. Fitzherbert, the prince’s mistress.” And since just the eye of one’s lover was visible, the piece could be worn while your inamorata’s identify remained secret. It’s also been theorized that the “single eye also symbolized the watchful gaze of a jealous partner, who feared that his or her lover might stray.” Scandalous, juicy, royal and pretty: my kind of history.

I’ve found that, once you start digging, it seems as though lover’s eyes are everywhere you look. Needless to say, I can’t wait to see one in person. Philadelphia, I’m coming for you!

 

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All Things Brass

Mariah of Size Too Small is one of the few bloggers i have actually been lucky enough to meet in real life. she has impeccable taste, which you can see in person if you visit her husband Andrew’s shop Selah in the newly opened Woodstock Foundry in Cape Town that Mariah designed & styled.


Lately I’ve been obsessed with all things brass- especially jewelry. My collection of brass candlestick holders continues to grow (it could never really be big enough) and now my brass jewelry is beginning to multiply as well. Here are a few other things in brass form I wouldn’t mind having.

1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7. 

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Period and Costume Dramas Tour

man oh man, when Hila sent me this guest post i actually squealed like a little girl. one of my favourite things about her blog is when she talks about films, and quite a few of those are period dramas. we have actually done a couple of comparisons projects that fall into this category, so we are kindred spirits when it comes to our love for a good costume drama. plus who wouldn’t enjoy getting another look at colin firth as darcy?


Hello, I’m Hila from the blog, le projet d’amour. When Diana asked me to contribute a guest post, I wanted to compile a special one to thank her for her own fabulous guest posts on my blog last year. When I asked her to do these posts, I was in the middle of writing my book (and very, very stressed). I recently finished this book and sent it off to my publisher. A few days later, I started getting all sentimental about the process of researching and writing the book. So I thought it would be nice to share one of the loveliest aspects of my research here.

My book is on film and television adaptations of famous literature. Along the way, I’ve delved into the various locations where these period and costume dramas were shot. Here are a few of my favourite locations …

The Temple of Apollo, Stourhead Garden, Wiltshire, England

In Joe Wright’s 2005 version of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Darcy dramatically proposes to Lizzie in the grand Temple of Apollo in Stourhead Garden. This shooting location seems like a good nod to the Regency period in which Austen’s novels were originally set, because neo-classical buildings such as this one were quite popular during this time. Austen’s society had a bit of a craze for the style, architecture and fashion of ancient Greece and Rome, and many Regency buildings imitated ancient classical temples.

Haddon Hall, Derbyshire, England

The latest 2011 film adaptation of Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre directed by Cary Fukunaga was partly filmed at Haddon Hall, which served as the setting for Rochester’s family home in the book, Thornfield Hall. There were many, many other period dramas filmed in Haddon Hall, including Elizabeth (1999), Franco Zeffirelli’s Jane Eyre (1996) and the BBC’s 2006 production of Jane Eyre with Ruth Wilson and Toby Stephens. I personally think though that Fukunaga made the best use of the impressive space of Haddon Hall to highlight the original Gothic undertones of Brontë’s novel.

Lyme Park, Cheshire, England

Lyme Park is the famous location for Darcy’s heart-stopping lake swim in the BBC’s 1995 television serial of Pride and Prejudice. I think we can all agree that this lake scene with Colin Firth will go down in history as one of the best moments in period drama. They just don’t make sexy British repression like they used to.

Saltram House, Plymouth, Devon, England

Saltram House is the shooting location for Norland Park in Ang Lee’s version of Sense and Sensibility (1995). This is my favourite adaptation of the novel, and Saltram House seems to encapsulate the Regency’s ‘Era of Elegance’ with its cool white exterior, harmonious architecture and perfectly manicured grounds. And while we’re speaking of Lee’s Sense and Sensibility, you really have to go read these hilarious extracts from Emma Thompson’s personal diaries while shooting the film. You can thank me later.

Manorbier Castle, Pembrokeshire, Wales

Dodie Smith’s I Capture the Castle was one of my favourite novels when I was growing up. When it was turned into a film in 2001 by Tim Fywell, I was instantly smitten yet again. The eccentric Mortmain family’s castle home is set in Manorbier Castle in Wales, although many of the interior scenes were shot elsewhere. But there is a unique romance to the rugged exterior scenes and crumbling castle.

The Moors, Yorkshire, England

Nearly every single film and television version of Emily Brontë’s classic novel, Wuthering Heights, features sweeping shots of the Yorkshire moors. Although the moors cover vast areas of England, when most people refer to ‘the moors’ they’re usually speaking about the landscape known as ‘Brontë country’ in West Yorkshire, England. I was lucky enough to visit the village where the Brontës lived and wrote for my research, staying in a house that was the former residence of their doctor. It was just lovely (but cold!).

Fountains Abbey, North Yorkshire, England

Agnieszka Holland’s beautiful adaptation of The Secret Garden (1993) was filmed on location at Fountains Abbey in North Yorkshire. I remember reading The Secret Garden when I was younger, loving all the small details about plant life and the natural environment. I think Holland’s film homage to the novel is a loving and sumptuous visual interpretation of such passages in the book.

I hope you enjoyed my mini period and costume dramas tour!

All images are screen-grabs made by me from the following films and serials (top to bottom): Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre, Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, I Capture the Castle, Wuthering Heights and The Secret Garden.

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An Extra Day

today i’m handing over the reins to some excellent guest bloggers who will be sharing very cool posts over the next 2 weeks! i’ll still be on twitter, and possibly posting photos of my new place & its progression on instagram.

first up is Vic who you may know from photography projects like Other People’s Houses and 1010. she has a series on her blog called No Biggie that never fails to surprise me (and make me laugh).


Hello. It’s vic here. I just wanted to thank Diana for asking me to blog while she’s moving. It’s an honour to be able to tell you about my latest little project:

Every four years, we get an extra day at the end of February. A free 24 hours. This year, I wanted to make mine special, to really do something.

So I walked around central London with a friend with the intention of meeting 24 new people, taking their photos and putting them online. All in 24 hours.

We met a man who’s been selling fruit for 50 years. A woman who scouts models. We met someone who’s dreading saying goodbye, someone hoping for good news. We talked about Kanye West, about fashion, drama school, Miss Piggy and Jon Hamm, we talked about values and a sense of community. A couple of people thought we were crazy. Only two

people we asked said no. Mostly, we were reminded that people are surprising, interesting, open and kind. Everyone has a story to tell.

29th February, 2012 was: anextraday.com

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