a single house

the house from a single man is still up for sale, by the way. just in case you were on the market and you wanted to spend in the region of $1,5 million (or less? i mean, in the current climate…) – this would be a good buy. designed in 1948 by john lautner; it is an open plan living masterpiece made from redwood, concrete and glass which opens up to the oak forest that surrounds it. heaven?

ceramic house

the design of this attic to maximise space & provide for various living areas on different levels is pretty darn cool.

instead of taking the existing rooms as a starting point, the architect placed a large three-dimensional object in the space, creating a play of heights and a second level. the mezzanine-like structure not only provides a separate sleeping area and extra storage, but also screens off a kitchen area and bathroom.

kapama karula

don’t ask me why but i have been looking at a ton of safari lodges lately (no i’m not planning a trip, if only) and amongst all the usual colonial african, hunting lodge, dark leather couches, elephant heads on the walls and springbok hides on the floor kind of places i discovered kapama karula. aaaah, a serene non-kitsch sanctuary in the middle of the african bush. sign me up, please. pass me a gin while i look at some lions and enjoy the vervet monkeys… that would be great.

must be heaven

i’m going to have to set aside some time to browse through UGArdener‘s almost 8000 photos on flickr, because they are literally what i imagine heaven to be like – beautiful houses, amazing gardens, huge old trees – ranging from towns in the southern states of the US through to country gardens in england. his own garden is incredible, too.

california modern

i already expressed my love for old school victoriana houses – but this is the flip side of the coin. i can definitely see myself being very comfortable in a mid-century modern house, especially since i grew up in one – i love an expanse of glass and open living areas. julius schulman was a well known architectural photographer from that era, and his imagery certainly makes me appreciate these buildings even more.