Photography

Li Hui

continuing with Flickr Fridays! i have noticed and admired the work of Li Hui for years on Flickr, so I was surprised to find that i had never actually done a post about her before (cannot keep track after all these years i guess). she is a self-taught photographer who only uses film. something you might notice is that her subjects never show their faces, and she gives a reason for that in this interview:

My pictures never shows faces because I think this is a way of communicating with the viewer. The pictures remind us of our common feelings, secrets, past memories or magical dreams. The people in my pictures are not supposed to be unknown faces, but the viewer him- or herself.

browse her dreamy body of work at her website, tumblr and, of course, flickr.

all photographs by Li Hui.

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Hanne Johansen

i’ve decided, in addition to a friday these things, that i will be instituting a Flickr Friday around here. first up is Hanne Johansen, because this photo absolutely stole my heart. she is a student and animal lover who lives in Oslo, and you can find more photos at her flickr and blog.

Hanne Johansen
Hanne Johansen
Hanne Johansen
Hanne Johansen
Hanne Johansen
Hanne Johansen
Hanne Johansen
Hanne Johansen
Hanne Johansen
Hanne Johansen

all photos by Hanne Johansen

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The Silence of Dogs in Cars

The Silence of Dogs in Cars is a project by photographer Martin Usborne. it is as beautiful and striking as it is sad and upsetting… and sometimes, oddly amusing. i have picked my ten favourites below out of the 41 amazing photographs he took for the series. of course no one can describe the project better than Martin himself,

I was once left in a car at a young age. I don’t know when or where or for how long, possibly at the age of four, perhaps outside a supermarket, probably for fifteen minutes only. The details don’t matter. The point is that I wondered if anyone would come back. The fear I felt was strong: in a child’s mind it is possible to be alone forever.

Around the same age I began to feel a deep affinity with animals – in particular their plight at the hands of humans. I saw a TV documentary that included footage of a dog being put in a plastic bag and being kicked. What appalled me most was that the dog could not speak back.

I should say that I was a well-loved child and never abandoned and yet it is clear that both these experiences arose from the same place deep inside me: a fear of being alone and unheard.

When I started this project I knew the photos would be dark. In a sense, I was attempting to go back inside my car, to re-experience what I couldn’t bear as a child. What I didn’t expect was to see so many subtle reactions by the dogs: some sad, some expectant, some angry, some dejected. It was as if upon opening up a box of grey-coloured pencils I was surprised to see so many shades inside.

There is life in the darkest places inside us.

Martin is currently spending a year to see how many animals he can save in 365 days. Read the ongoing blog here. He hopes for this to become his next book.

thanks to Thisispaper for introducing me to his work.

all photos by Martin Usborne

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VSCO Grid

if you’re a regular iPhone snapper / Instagrammer (or, indeed, a professional photographer) you’ll be familiar with VSCO. their original VSCO Cam iPhone app is a favourite of many, with a handful of beautiful film presets and easy editing tools that turn your every day photos into something pretty magical. they just released their updated app (so you can’t get the old one anymore) – and it’s now free, but features in-app purchases for several film bundles. faded & moody; bright + clean; analog classic… take your pick. i haven’t played with it too much, but it is a sweet little app and i know it will help make my pretty average photos on instagram look just that little bit better.

the most exciting thing about the update for me is their release of VSCO Grid - a free minimalist publishing platform for people to showcase their mobile photography. they emphasise that it’s not a social media platform – i.e. not a competitor for Instagram – but rather, “focused on craft, curation and content, and less on followers and likes.” at the moment it’s in the beta / testing / let’s hope we don’t break the servers / only for awesome people phase, but hopefully it will roll out to the rest of us soon.

edit: just got mine! check it out here: missmoss.vsco.co

here are some cool people whose grids you can check out so far.

s. Fawn DeViney:

Kevin Russ (also know as a bit of an Instagram demi-god):

Nirav Patel:

Dear Leila:

Tim Lampe:

and some more to follow: Ana Barros; Mark Weaver; Jerad Knudson; Joanne (aka The Mrs); Carter Moore; Greg Lutze. discover and read more about VSCO Grid here.

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Joni Sternbach

Joni Sternbach is a photographer from New York who specialises in the early wet plate collodion photographic technique. she has many beautiful projects to explore on her website, but the one that caught my eye was Surfland – where Joni documents surfers on the coasts of the US and Australia.

SurfLand is an ongoing project of contemporary portraits of surfers created using the historic wet-plate collodion process. The photographs are a unique blending of subject matter and photographic technique. Using the instantaneous wet-plate collodion process, I am creating one-of-a-kind tintypes that are imbued with a feeling of ambiguity, timelessness and mystery.

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Robert Kaczyński

i know a lot of people have been complaining about the new flickr (oh don’t you hate it when a service you use just does something like that without warning) – but personally i only use it to browse other people’s work, and i am really enjoying the new photostreams. large, lovely pictures that i can get lost in. especially the work of photographer Robert Kaczyński, whose beautiful film photography will make you momentarily forget everything else.

all photographs by Robert Kaczyński

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Bright Continent

when i think about how little i have travelled in Africa, a continent i’ve lived on for the better part of 30 years, i am actually pretty ashamed of myself. part of that can be to blame on the fact that i’m just a little bit of a lazy traveller. it’s easy to jump on a plane and book into hotels or backpackers in Europe. it’s just easy. (saving up for that flight to europe is not to easy, though). Africa is hard, in more ways than one. you need to have a pinch of the adventurer in you to deal with the interesting modes of transport and long drives, or dodgy bus trips, to get where you want to go. but once you’re there… man, is it worth it.

Anton Crone is a SA photographer & journalist who documents his African travels on his blog Bright Continent. on the surface it’s just amazing to see all the beautiful places that he has visited (Lake Malawi has long been one of my dream destinations) – but like the best travel blogs out there you gain a better understanding of life in Africa through the stories and anecdotes that he shares. i must admit i had something in my eye after reading this story of the Mfuwe school in Zambia.

you can follow him on twitter & read more of his travel articles at Getaway (want to know what it’s like to drive a Smart Car from Cape Town to the Ngorongoro Crater? he did that too). all photos by Anton Crone.














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Ren Rox

i thought it was great timing to show you the work of Ren Rox since Flickr has just been given a design update (and everyone gets 1 terabyte free storage, which is pretty cool). so now you can browse her work with lovely big pictures and endless scrolling – the way all photostreams should be viewed.

her photography has appeared in The Face, Lula, Dazed & Confused, Oyster, NME and many more publications. see more of Ren’s work at her website, flickr & tumblr.

all photos by Ren Rox

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