abstract art

Alexia Vogel

i love these oil paintings by local artist Alexia Vogel.

Alexia Vogel is a recent Michaelis School of Fine Art graduate. She considers all of her paintings landscapes, even the most abstract ones. She works from old family photographs of landscapes which she feels are imbued with a romantic sentimentality. Her work is very personal, as she considers it the affect of these images, or the memory of them. - via 10and5

Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel

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Helen Frankenthaler

today i’m inspired by the work of legendary abstract expressionist Helen Frankenthaler. her huge colourful paintings look like gigantic watercolours, but are in fact painted with oils & acrylics. Helen would work directly on unprepared canvas, and dilute the oil paint with turpentine (later she switched to acrylic paint), causing it to soak into the canvas – a technique called “soak stain” that was later adopted by other abstract expressionists like Jackson Pollock. her work was not highly gestural and painterly, instead she preferred to create pieces that looked as if they were “born in a minute”.

A really good picture looks as if it’s happened at once. It’s an immediate image. For my own work, when a picture looks labored and overworked, and you can read in it – well, she did this and then she did that, and then she did that – there is something in it that has not got to do with beautiful art to me. … I think very often it takes ten of those over-labored efforts to produce one really beautiful wrist motion that is synchronized with your head and heart, and you have it, and therefore it looks as if it were born in a minute.

What concerns me when I work, is not whether the picture is a landscape, or whether it’s pastoral, or whether somebody will see a sunset in it. What concerns me is – did I make a beautiful picture?

Helen was born and raised in New York, and was celebrated in the NYC art scene since her debut in the 50s.  she produced work until her death in 2011 (you can read her obituary at the New York Times), and apart from her painting she also created lithographs, etchings, screen prints and woodcuts. you can see her work at many institutions across the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, MOMA, the Guggenheim and the Centre Pompidou in Paris.

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Gordon Parks for Life Magazine

photographed by Gordon Parks for Life Magazine, 1956

Basque Beach, 1958 by Helen Frankenthaler

Basque Beach, 1958

Summer Scene Provincetown, 1961 by Helen Frankenthaler

Summer Scene Provincetown, 1961

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Ernst Haas
Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Ernst Haas

photographed in her studio by Ernst Haas

Flood, 1967 by Helen Frankenthaler

Flood, 1967

Tutti Fruitti, 1966 by Helen Frankenthaler

Tutti Fruitti, 1966

Helen Frankenthaler, photographer unknown

photographed by by Alexander Liberman

Nepenthe, 1972 by Helen Frankenthaler

Nepenthe, 1972

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by William Grigsby

photographed by William Grigsby in her home, 1967

Untitled, 1965 by Helen Frankenthaler

Untitled, 1965

Helen Frankenthaler by Alexander Liberman

photographed by Alexander Liberman

Persian Garden, 1965 by Helen Frankenthaler

Persian Garden, 1965

Portrait of Helen Frankenthaler in front of woodblock proofs for Essence Mulberry, 1977

Helen Frankenthaler in front of woodblock proofs for Essence Mulberry, 1977 photographed by Lindsay Green

Helen Frankenthaler Lithographs at MOM

lithographs in the collection of MOMA

Helen-Frankenthaler-Alexander-Liberman

in her studio by Alexander Liberman

Small Paradise, 1964 by Helen Frankenthaler

Small Paradise, 1964

Helen Frankenthaler by Michael Fredericks

photographed by Michael Fredericks

Snowpines, 2004 by Helen Frankenthaler

Snowpines, 2004

Helen Frankenthaler, Painted on 21st Street

Painted on 21st Street

Untitled, 1963 by Helen Frankenthaler

Untitled, 1963

Helen Frankenthaler, photographer unknown

photographed by Alexander Liberman

Indian Summer, 1967 by Helen Frankenthaler

Indian Summer, 1967

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Dan Budnick

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Dan Budnick

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Pepa Prieto

i am fascinated by the work of artist Pepa Prieto, who was born in southern Spain, went to boarding school in England and now lives and works in New York. she has quite a varied body of work stemming from 2005 to now, but something i find consistently beautiful are those brush strokes that seem to coil their way through her pieces.

The paintings are small fragments of my universes, virtual landscapes, jungles of vegetation, ritual objects, memory embodied in physical objects, emotional constructions, human rituals, patterns and colors from memory- things seen from the inside out.

see a selection of her work at her website. all images & quote courtesy of Pepe Prieto.

Artist: Pepa Prieto Artist: Pepa Prieto Artist: Pepa Prieto Artist: Pepa Prieto Artist: Pepa Prieto Artist: Pepa Prieto Artist: Pepa Prieto Artist: Pepa Prieto

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Michelle Armas

i really REALLY love the work of artist Michelle Armas. she started painting to cope with the stress of her career in the world of corporate branding, and eventually turned it into a full-time job. i love stories like that, and it makes me think of a cool quote from designer extraordinaire Jessica Hische – “The work you do while you procrastinate is probably the work you should be doing for the rest of your life.”

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