africa

Aerial Botswana

whenever you read this, we will either be on a plane or in a rental car or dodging potholes or already in THE BUSH. yes! we are going to the Kruger Park for our (hopefully) annual trip. you can read my post & see all the photos from last year here. i will only be gone a week, but i have lots of posts scheduled for while i’m away – so please do keep checking in.

i have been waiting for a moment to share these exquisite aerial photos of the wildlife & landscapes in Botswana by Brooklyn based photographer Zack Seckler. i have looked at them time and time again, and actually have them rotating on my desktop as wallpaper right now. i love them SO much. not just because i absolutely love Africa – and feel so lucky to live here – but because they are obviously damn beautiful. i have never been to Botswana, even though it neighbours us. it is a trip i hope to make soon.

Within the first few minutes of being up there, I was just completely blown away. Being in that airspace, you’re really seeing the world from a perspective that only birds see. Obviously no human on the ground can see that, and the big jumbo jets up above don’t fly that low. So it’s kind of this hidden airspace to the human eye, and it just immediately struck me as a really powerful visual.

excerpt from this interview at Wired. all photos c/o Zack Seckler.
i suggest you go see all of them on his website, as they look better BIG.

Zack SecklerZack SecklerZack SecklerZack SecklerZack SecklerZack SecklerZack SecklerZack SecklerZack SecklerZack Seckler

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Lynnie Zulu

browsing the vibrant work of London based illustrator Lynnie Zulu is the perfect antidote to a Monday. growing up in Scotland, drawing was a form of escapism from an early age and much of her work draws from her family’s Tanzanian heritage. also the cursor on her website is a watermelon… it doesn’t get much more cheerful than that. you can buy some of her prints at Ohh Deer and Deer Brains, and original work at Art Wednesday.

Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu

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Viviane Sassen

you might already know of Dutch photographer Viviane Sassen from the work she’s done for renowned fashion magazines and fashion houses the likes of Carven & Missoni. her most beautiful visuals, in my opinion, is a series called Flamboya which was shot in Kenya (where she spent part of her childhood) Uganda, Tanzania and Zambia. the name is taken from the red blossomed Flamboyant tree which grows across East and South Africa.

As long as I can remember, I have felt very close to Africa. This is most probably due to the fact that I lived with my family in Kenya when I was a child. Yet, this very experience of closeness has also engendered contradictory feelings. While feeling to be a part of this world, I have also kept on being aware of the fact that I would never really be a part of it. Very soon, I have come to understand that I would always remain a stranger. In this way I try in my work to figure this ambiguity. You feel close but at the same time distant. And that is something that is most of times absent in traditional Western depictions of Africa, always clearly reflecting the interpretation and gaze of Westerners.

Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya
Viviane Sassen // Flamboya

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Bright Continent

when i think about how little i have travelled in Africa, a continent i’ve lived on for the better part of 30 years, i am actually pretty ashamed of myself. part of that can be to blame on the fact that i’m just a little bit of a lazy traveller. it’s easy to jump on a plane and book into hotels or backpackers in Europe. it’s just easy. (saving up for that flight to europe is not to easy, though). Africa is hard, in more ways than one. you need to have a pinch of the adventurer in you to deal with the interesting modes of transport and long drives, or dodgy bus trips, to get where you want to go. but once you’re there… man, is it worth it.

Anton Crone is a SA photographer & journalist who documents his African travels on his blog Bright Continent. on the surface it’s just amazing to see all the beautiful places that he has visited (Lake Malawi has long been one of my dream destinations) – but like the best travel blogs out there you gain a better understanding of life in Africa through the stories and anecdotes that he shares. i must admit i had something in my eye after reading this story of the Mfuwe school in Zambia.

you can follow him on twitter & read more of his travel articles at Getaway (want to know what it’s like to drive a Smart Car from Cape Town to the Ngorongoro Crater? he did that too). all photos by Anton Crone.














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Kruger Park

Miss Moss // Kruger Park

i’m so excited to share these photos of our trip to the bush! a lot of what we saw couldn’t be captured on film – the animals are simply too fast for you sometimes, and most of the time they’re too far away to get a great shot – unless you have a telephoto lens (and you’ll see a lot of people with SERIOUS lenses in the park, trying to get that perfect shot). our best moments were experienced through binoculars – which are an essential item to have if you’re ever considering a trip to Kruger (or any game park in Africa).

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