Girl In The Wild

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my friend Amy recently moved away to work at a game lodge in the bush, and though i will seriously miss her while she’s gone (i hate it when friends move away, why can’t we all just stay in the same city, huh?) i know she’s going to love it, because Amz is a bush girl. it’s also not many people who get to live in the African bush – that is a rare treasure, and something you should do once in your life if you can.

looking up

my brother sent this to me – he explores google earth as much as i explore google street maps. it’s the most amazing scene of people in a market in tanzania looking up at whatever it was that took this aerial photograph (airplane? helicopter?) … the shot is so detailed and colourful and so very african. i love it. here is the google earth placemark if you want to have a look yourself (if you don’t have google earth on your computer – get it!)

kapama karula

don’t ask me why but i have been looking at a ton of safari lodges lately (no i’m not planning a trip, if only) and amongst all the usual colonial african, hunting lodge, dark leather couches, elephant heads on the walls and springbok hides on the floor kind of places i discovered kapama karula. aaaah, a serene non-kitsch sanctuary in the middle of the african bush. sign me up, please. pass me a gin while i look at some lions and enjoy the vervet monkeys… that would be great.

africanis

In Daniel Naudé’s first solo show, he presents a world that appears to be a fairy tale, or a fictional place: We see a donkey with the grace of a race horse. Next to an impossibly beautiful rainbow, a white mule almost turns into a unicorn. The hills and veld that Naudé invites us to traverse are filled with wonderful creatures, each more proud, perfect, and present than the next.

you can call me al

this gives me such goosebumps, it’s ridiculous! also makes me want to jump up & dance like a crazy. the concert was  in 1987  & held in harare – you can buy the dvd at amazon (or take2 for the locals). the graceland clip is equally rad.

ethiopia

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a work colleague recently returned from a trip to ethiopia. i want to go to there (is that ever going to get old?)

dominic nahr

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dominic nahr – photojournalist. story at the ny times, thanks to henno for bringing him to my attention

ghana film posters

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In the 1980s video cassette technology made it possible for “mobile cinema” operators in Ghana to travel from town to town and village to village creating temporary cinemas.  In order to promote these showings, artists were hired to paint large posters of the films & were given the artistic freedom to paint the posters as they desired – often adding elements that weren’t in the actual films, or without even having seen the movies.