architecture

Cinemas of India

between 2010-13 Sabine Haubitz + Stefanie Zoche photographed old movie theatres in South India. you can understand the significance of the cinema experience in a country that is the world’s largest producer of films. no wonder the buildings dedicated to them are so rich & beautiful.

The photos of these buildings give eloquent testimony to the rich cinematic culture of those times. We are particularly interested in the culturally influenced reinterpretation of modern building style apparent in the architectural style, which displays an unusual mixture of Modernism, local architectural elements, a strong use of colour and, in the case of some older cinema halls, of Art Deco.

Many movie theatres in South India are left in their original state. Nonetheless, remodelling into multiplex cinemas is already underway, in particular in major cities, and will result in these buildings’ disappearance as witnesses to their times. The photographs document a part of cinema culture that has already largely vanished in Europe and the USA, and is increasingly being supplanted by commercial interests and technical developments in India, as well.

simply too good not to share – thanks designboom.

Cinemas of India
Cinemas of India
Cinemas of India
Cinemas of India
Cinemas of India
Cinemas of India
Cinemas of India
Cinemas of India
Cinemas of India
Cinemas of India
Cinemas of India
Cinemas of India
Cinemas of India
Cinemas of India

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The Fagans

hello! please excuse the radio silence since last week, but we just got back from an epic road trip (which you might have noticed on Instagram, more on that tomorrow) so there is a LOAD of catching up to do around here! and what better way than sharing a beautiful home of two inspirational people – a place i am quite familiar with and have been dying to visit myself.

Gwen and Gawie Fagan are a somewhat legendary local couple who have a home called Die Es (The Hearth) in Camps Bay that they designed and built themselves in 1965. Gawie is an incredibly accomplished architect with a career spanning over 6 decades. Gwen was a medical doctor who changed professions and joined Gawie’s architectural firm in 1969 as a historical researcher & landscape planner. in 1995 she received her PhD in landscape architecture. they have 3 honorary doctorates between the two of them. they’re both almost 90 and haven’t stopped working.

in short: legends.

so it was really nice to see their home featured on FvF recently, interviewed and photographed by local photography couple Antonia Heil and Desmond Louw. Die Es is regularly open for architectural tours, which you can find out about here.

The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw
The Fagans, Cape Town. Photographed for Freunden von Freunden by Antonia Heil & Desmond Louw

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Casa No Tempo

Casa No Tempo is an old family farm situated on 400 hectares just outside Lisbon, Portugal, that was renovated by João and Andreia Rodrigues (along with design firm Aires Mateus) and turned into sparse yet luxe bed and breakfast accommodation. it reminds me of some of the old farms you see in South Africa, the ideal place to getaway to in my opinion. also, that pool!

Casa No Tempo has been in the family for many years. It was our granddad’s will that we look after it until the next generation. Being aware of his vision we tried to aim higher, connecting the past with the coming future,  leaving out the marks of time, in search for a peaceful and timeless place.

Casa No Tempo
Casa No Tempo
Casa No Tempo
Casa No Tempo
Casa No Tempo
Casa No Tempo
Casa No Tempo
Casa No Tempo
Casa No Tempo
Casa No Tempo
Casa No Tempo
Casa No Tempo
Casa No Tempo
Casa No Tempo
Casa No Tempo

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Archist

since it’s a bit of a design slash art history day around here – i dig these clever Archist posters by Italian architect & designer Federico Babina, where he imagines what buildings by 27 famous artists would look like (Architect + Artist – get it!)

the important question is – which of these building would you actually want to live in? i think walking into Keith Haring’s dog house every day would put a big smile on my face. otherwise i’d have to go for Duchamp’s building, for sheer wack factor.

all images c/o  Federico Babina. see them all here. buy any of these as a print on Society6.

Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist

 

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1890 Spindrift Drive

i was digging around in the Life Magazine archives (as i often do) when i came across these photos of a beautiful modern beach house in the La Jolla shores area of San Diego. after doing a bit of research i learned that it was designed by american architect William Kesling for Walton MacConnell in 1946-47. amazingly the original address is actually listed, so i looked it up on google maps – and it seems like some of the original part of the house might still be in existence! though it looks to have been extended on a massive scale.

i find that so unfortunate about beach properties these days, i know that it’s prime real estate and only super rich people can really afford them – and they have all the money to build super huge mansions – but it’s a shame to me that you don’t often see the small, charming beach cottages that were built back in the 40s, 50s, 60s… there are still a handful of them in Cape Town, you can spot a few original bungalows on the shores of Clifton and Camps Bay beaches. i hope that their owners never turn them into monstrous mansions.

anyhoo! these are nice pics to look at anyway. they were taken in 1947 by Peter Stackpole and featured in the November 3 issue of Life Magazine, pages 154-160. it all sounds pretty amazing… except maybe for that Cuban houseboy. here are some of my favourite bits:

With a Cuban houseboy, a barbeque pit, a fishing rod and a telescope, retired bachelor Walton MacConnell has settled down in the elegant, sunny little town of La Jolla, California to a pleasant, lounging existence. As a setting for this life he has built himself a dramatic, glossy, $40,000 home which hugs the edge of a 50-foot seaside cliff. Here the Pacific swishes around under the living-room floor and occasionally splashes up soothingly over the huge windows.

In the living room his guests loll around, waiting until nightfall when they usually dress formally for a dance in the cliff-enclosed patio.

At night, when there is no reflection, the living room window is invisible and MacConnell worries constantly lest unsuspecting guests walk right through it. So far several have hit it but none has been hurt.

On the bedroom roof guest Nancy Chase snoozes. Roofing of asphalt and crushed ceramics reflects extra sun for an even tan.

you can read the original article at the bottom of the post.















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Carlos Motta

i was just thinking the other day how tired i was of seeing white white white interiors everywhere on the internet, even though they are beautiful (don’t get me wrong). but sometimes you just don’t see enough variety – which i suppose is the problem with the internet, if you follow the same blogs or don’t wander far from the safety of your pinterest feed. so when i saw the work of brazilian architect & designer Carlos Motta, which focuses on the natural beauty of wood, i ended up flipping through every single image on his website. many of the houses his atelier has designed are situated in the Serra da Mantiqueira mountain range in the state of São Paulo. this one – Carlos Motta’s own home – has to be my favourite.

The Atelier Carlos Motta was born in the 70’s, through a strong counterculture movement. Surf, Yoga, food and a natural life. Ecology and respect for nature, pulsing through our veins. It’s at the genesis and at the Atelier DNA the environmental and social responsibility. The architecture and design that we develop here at the Atelier follow together the same concept: the search for the obvious, the simple, respectful and longevous.








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Home Talk

at the moment i am thinking about our home a lot. we are currently happily living in our Sea Point apartment that’s big enough for the two of us (and we are lucky enough to be right by the promenade) – but i know that we both dream of an outside space and everything that comes with that. a dog, a cat… and other little beings that like to play in a garden. one step at a time – i know, i know. but i can’t help thinking of that possible future place, which is why i want to have a Home Talk.

i had to kick off with possibly the most beautiful house i have seen this year. designed by architect Ray Kappe in 1967, who still lives here with his wife:

local favourite furniture designers Pedersen & Lennard just opened their online shop:

love the home of Kirsten Grove featured by Rue Magazine:

could see these two Magical Thinking rugs happily chilling in my home. buy: left & right.

Vanessa Jackman’s visit to Villa Extramuros in Portugal, which boasts beautiful interiors and exteriors:

cool wares from vintage shop Ethanollie:

like the little corner desk of this Parisian apartment:

sweet home things from Makers & Brothers:

the home of Wood & Wool Stool designer Ingrid Jansen:

colourful utensils by Sucre:

a simple DIY shelf by Scandi Home (adapted from these instructions):

at home with Jennifer Bewerse:

beautiful homeware by Neëst:

watercolour wallpaper by Emma Hayes:

Ermie has a selection of home goods for you to peruse:

and, a public loo in London that was turned into an amazing apartment by architect Laura Clark:

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Can Lis

Can Lis is the Majorcan home of Danish architect Jørn Utzon (who designed a little something called the Sydney Opera House, amongst other things). it was built in 1972 using traditional Majorcan building methods & local materials, and was designed to embrace the day-to-day life of his family. recently renovated and restored, it now serves as a refuge for working architects & artists. so if you’re keen to take some creative time out on the Balearic Islands you might consider applying for  one of their residency programmes.

one thing i love about architecturally designed houses from that era was how often things were permanently built in – you’ll notice the sandstone benches and table in the outdoor entertainment area, as well as the sandstone shelving. not to mention that half-moon “couch” in the living room. no more agonising about what sofa you’re going to get, huh?


















photographs by Torben Eskerod

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Raymond Loewy House, Palm Springs

i was browsing through my brother’s huge collection of architectural inspiration when i came across the Raymond Loewy House designed by Albert Frey. Raymond Loewy was an industrial designer notable for his work on the coca-cola bottle, the shell logo, the lucky strike pack and many other iconic designs. he even appeared on the cover of Time in 1949. so i guess it goes without saying that such a brilliant creative mind would live in an equally brilliant creative home.

Designed by Palm Springs architect Albert Frey, built in 1946-47 as a bachelor retreat, and expanded later when Loewy got married. Loewy’s home is a typical Palm Springs modernist villa with a low-slung pavilion and plenty of glass providing striking views of desert, mountains, and the pool and garden… making the private oasis complete. Loewy despised “bad modern” design, especially furniture, so the size, shape, and rooms of the home and furnishings were kept simple and spare. It is a demure house of small size but generous impact.

quote & images courtesy of  Faustian Urge

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