Art

Emily Ferretti

i love the cool hued work of Aussie artist Emily Ferretti. she is represented by the Sophie Gannon Gallery. these pieces also appear in her book!

Ferretti’s oil-on-linen paintings of plants, rocks, domestic settings, sporting ephemera and architectural details are remarkable for their lightness of touch and subtleties in process, tonality and mark making, sidling the representational and abstract via a quiet, poetic tenor. Isolated from wider narrative and context, her various fragmentary scenes – athletic tracks, skate ramps, pot plants or winter forest scapes – work to bestow the day-to-day with a particular gravity and significance.

Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti

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Kemi Mai

Kemi Mai is an eighteen year old illustrator from Manchester who i am SUPREMELY JEALOUS OF. this girl can do amazing things with pixels. she makes her art using a tablet and photoshop. she is amazing, check out her work here and here.

My work starts with an idea derived from thoughts or abstract feelings, which I aim to express in a way that also appeals to me atheistically. Colour has become incredibly important to me, it can be so influential in setting the overall tone of the piece. I like to think of the majority of my paintings as visual representations of things that couldn’t exist organically in real life. Whilst an element of realism is important to me, I haven’t ever been interested in depicting a scene that resembles a photograph without a concept. My work isn’t weighted with messages intended to change the world, but it’s something through which I can be honest, and I appreciate that freedom greatly.

Kemi Mai Kemi Mai Kemi Mai Kemi Mai Kemi Mai Kemi Mai Kemi Mai Kemi Mai Kemi Mai Kemi Mai

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Chris Turnham

the modernist feeling in these rad illustrations by the very talented LA based illustrator & printmaker Chris Turnham made me want to watch Mad Men right away. luckily the last season is just around the corner, my pretties.

Chris Turnham Chris Turnham Chris Turnham Chris Turnham Chris Turnham Chris Turnham Chris Turnham Chris Turnham Chris Turnham Chris Turnham Chris Turnham

 

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Archist

since it’s a bit of a design slash art history day around here – i dig these clever Archist posters by Italian architect & designer Federico Babina, where he imagines what buildings by 27 famous artists would look like (Architect + Artist – get it!)

the important question is – which of these building would you actually want to live in? i think walking into Keith Haring’s dog house every day would put a big smile on my face. otherwise i’d have to go for Duchamp’s building, for sheer wack factor.

all images c/o  Federico Babina. see them all here. buy any of these as a print on Society6.

Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist Archist

 

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Eugène Séguy: Insectes

just gonna file this under coolest things ever. these are illustrations by French entomologist Eugène Séguy, from a book detailing his illustrations of insects and colourful decorative compositions of their patterns and colouring dating from 1925. he was, understandably, more well-known for his brilliant pattern design than for his work as an entomologist – though the two are undeniably intertwined. read more about him here.

Eugene Alain Seguy was one of the foremost French designers at the beginning of the 20th century. Working in both the Art Deco and Art Nouveau styles, he published many design folios utilizing the pochoir technique, a printing process that employs a series of stencils to lay dense and vivid color. *

images c/o the Beineke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, part of the Yale University Library. you can actually download the entire catalog in PDF form.

Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes

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New Friends

i briefly featured the work of NYC based New Friends, aka Alexandra Segreti and Kelly Rakowski, last year - but i thought they deserved their own post because their work is just soooooo good. they were also featured in the UO blog last month and i just loved seeing a little tour of their studio.

New Friends design and produce weavings, textiles and housewares. They weave unique objects that combine the rich history of textiles and contemporary visual culture. The fibers used in their vivid, oddball collections range from locally sourced, plant dyed wools to man-made metallic threads.

photography c/o New Friends, studio images c/o the UO Blog, photographed by Jody Rogac.

New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends

 

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Tata Naka x Matisse

i LOVE Matisse. see evidence of my massive adoration for him here. so when i saw this exceptional Matisse inspired AW 14/15 pre-collection by talented twin sister design duo Tata Naka, i could not help but do a mash up.

Tata-Naka is designed by Georgian-born identical twins, Tamara and Natasha Surguladze. They arrived in London in 1996 to study design at Central St Martin’s and in 2000 Barneys NYC dedicated a wall to their awe-inspiring graduation collection. The Tata-Naka statement pieces regularly starred in the legendary series ‘’Sex in the City’’ and were worn by Carrie Bradshaw on the cover of the official book.

you can see the entire collection here. images c/o courtesy of Tata Naka. Henri Matisse clippings c/o Wikipaintings.

Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss

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Helen Frankenthaler

today i’m inspired by the work of legendary abstract expressionist Helen Frankenthaler. her huge colourful paintings look like gigantic watercolours, but are in fact painted with oils & acrylics. Helen would work directly on unprepared canvas, and dilute the oil paint with turpentine (later she switched to acrylic paint), causing it to soak into the canvas – a technique called “soak stain” that was later adopted by other abstract expressionists like Jackson Pollock. her work was not highly gestural and painterly, instead she preferred to create pieces that looked as if they were “born in a minute”.

A really good picture looks as if it’s happened at once. It’s an immediate image. For my own work, when a picture looks labored and overworked, and you can read in it – well, she did this and then she did that, and then she did that – there is something in it that has not got to do with beautiful art to me. … I think very often it takes ten of those over-labored efforts to produce one really beautiful wrist motion that is synchronized with your head and heart, and you have it, and therefore it looks as if it were born in a minute.

What concerns me when I work, is not whether the picture is a landscape, or whether it’s pastoral, or whether somebody will see a sunset in it. What concerns me is – did I make a beautiful picture?

Helen was born and raised in New York, and was celebrated in the NYC art scene since her debut in the 50s.  she produced work until her death in 2011 (you can read her obituary at the New York Times), and apart from her painting she also created lithographs, etchings, screen prints and woodcuts. you can see her work at many institutions across the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, MOMA, the Guggenheim and the Centre Pompidou in Paris.

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Gordon Parks for Life Magazine

photographed by Gordon Parks for Life Magazine, 1956

Basque Beach, 1958 by Helen Frankenthaler

Basque Beach, 1958

Summer Scene Provincetown, 1961 by Helen Frankenthaler

Summer Scene Provincetown, 1961

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Ernst Haas
Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Ernst Haas

photographed in her studio by Ernst Haas

Flood, 1967 by Helen Frankenthaler

Flood, 1967

Tutti Fruitti, 1966 by Helen Frankenthaler

Tutti Fruitti, 1966

Helen Frankenthaler, photographer unknown

photographed by by Alexander Liberman

Nepenthe, 1972 by Helen Frankenthaler

Nepenthe, 1972

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by William Grigsby

photographed by William Grigsby in her home, 1967

Untitled, 1965 by Helen Frankenthaler

Untitled, 1965

Helen Frankenthaler by Alexander Liberman

photographed by Alexander Liberman

Persian Garden, 1965 by Helen Frankenthaler

Persian Garden, 1965

Portrait of Helen Frankenthaler in front of woodblock proofs for Essence Mulberry, 1977

Helen Frankenthaler in front of woodblock proofs for Essence Mulberry, 1977 photographed by Lindsay Green

Helen Frankenthaler Lithographs at MOM

lithographs in the collection of MOMA

Helen-Frankenthaler-Alexander-Liberman

in her studio by Alexander Liberman

Small Paradise, 1964 by Helen Frankenthaler

Small Paradise, 1964

Helen Frankenthaler by Michael Fredericks

photographed by Michael Fredericks

Snowpines, 2004 by Helen Frankenthaler

Snowpines, 2004

Helen Frankenthaler, Painted on 21st Street

Painted on 21st Street

Untitled, 1963 by Helen Frankenthaler

Untitled, 1963

Helen Frankenthaler, photographer unknown

photographed by Alexander Liberman

Indian Summer, 1967 by Helen Frankenthaler

Indian Summer, 1967

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Dan Budnick

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Dan Budnick

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