artist

Rebekah Miles

my husband just returned from an extended trip to LA and he brought back some lovely gifts, including a ceramic piece by artist Rebekah Miles. she is a new discovery to me (of course some immediate googling ensued) and i really enjoyed delving into her unique ceramic creations as well as her absolutely awesome book covers.

I am primarily a painter using ceramics as my “canvas”. I started teaching myself ceramics as a way of exploring making paintings as functional, sculptural pieces. I love putting my personal touch on the age-old artisanal craft of shaping basic forms from slabs, molds and templates.

I paint one-of-a-kind book jackets on a range of subjects, specific artists, cultural topics, photographers and authors. The selected books are a reference to art history and the art of literature and libraries. This process gives the book a new essence, and restores it to better shape (I try to find used books). It also makes it a functional sculpture/painting.

Rebekah Miles
Rebekah Miles
Rebekah Miles
Rebekah Miles
Rebekah Miles
Rebekah Miles
Rebekah Miles
Rebekah Miles
Rebekah Miles
Rebekah Miles

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Will Cotton

did you ever read the Faraway Tree series by Enid Blyton? they were possibly my favourite books as a child (except maybe for anything by Roald Dahl) and i was instantly transported back to the Land of Goodies when seeing these paintings by Will Cotton. of course like most children’s books in those days everything wasn’t always sunshine and rainbows - there was always a moral to the story, and if you overindulged you were likely to learn a good lesson. that sinister undercurrent is certainly present in Cotton’s depictions of pin-up models in sugary sweet settings that look like they’re decaying before your eyes.

Cotton starts his process by building maquettes in his New York studio to paint from. These can range from table-top scenery to life-sized sets occupied by models dressed in confectionary costumes that Cotton has created. Constructing these sets allows the artist to see surprising and often unexpected details, enabling him to recreate textures and details in such a way that viewing the works becomes a tactile experience. “Sweetness taken to an extreme degree, as it is in my paintings, becomes cloying, even repulsive and that’s where it gets interesting for me.”

his work is currently showing at the Ronchini Gallery in London, so if you’re in the area go check out the exhibition.

Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton

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François Henri Galland

last week i hung some pictures in our apartment. Anton has lived there since 2010 and i moved in a few years ago – and till last week there were hardly any pictures up. which is crazy, right? considering how much i love art and surrounding myself with it. i guess it’s harder when there are two of you, and you have to compromise on what both of you like (and where it should go!) anyway now that those first few pics are up things are starting to snowball, and my thoughts are occupied with filling all the blank spaces.

i want to find something awesome for above our bed – and i’m vacillating between some smaller pictures or one HUGE piece that can fits over the entire headboard. when i saw these images by artist François Henri Galland i thought they would look amazing on a massive scale. they are also just the right amount of  dreamy and unnerving.

François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland

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Isca Greenfield-Sanders

Isca Greenfield-Sanders encapsulates summer and nostalgia in her paintings. she finds, scans, edits, and prints vintage photographs, alters them with watercolour and pencil, then mounts details from the images onto tiles before, finally, painting over them in oils.

Her primary interest is the figured landscape and its relationship to memory—how universally recognizable places (beaches, family picnics, poolside scenes) can evoke both deeply personal and communal associations and a sense of foreboding.

all images courtesy of Artsy

Isca Greenfield-Sanders Isca Greenfield-Sanders Isca Greenfield-Sanders Isca Greenfield-Sanders Isca Greenfield-Sanders Isca Greenfield-Sanders Isca Greenfield-Sanders Isca Greenfield-Sanders

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Lucie de Moyencourt

while i was enjoying the new Pichulik website yesterday i particularly loved their Brave Women series – intimate portraits of the women who wear Pichulik pieces. the first feature is on Lucie de Moyencourt who works as an architect, set designer, illustrator and painter.

lucie de moyencourt was born in 1983 in paris, she grew up in south africa, where she works as an architect, set designer, illustrator and painter. with no formal art training, painting and drawing is something lucie has always done for herself. by observing her subjects very closely, she allows the brush to move around the canvas without giving it much thought, trusting that her hand will do something intuitive to what she is seeing. lucie aims to complete a painting in one sitting, and enjoys working into wet paint with thicker layers of colour. “i paint because i am addicted to the ‘surprise’ that the painted canvas gives me when i step back from the easel”.

STORY: Pichulik. STILLS: Tommaso Fiscaletti. VIDEO: Johnathan Mellish. ART: Lucie de Moyencourt

Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt

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Alex Katz

inspired by the print work of artist Alex Katz today, which spans from the late 40s to the present day. you can see his entire impressive archive here.

Katz has admitted to destroying a thousand paintings during his first ten years as a painter in order to find his style. Since the 1950s, he worked to create art more freely in the sense that he tried to paint “faster than he can think.” His works seem simple, but according to Katz they are more reductive, which is fitting to his personality.

Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz

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Winnie Truong

it’s always wonderful to see what can happen in a year, and it was almost exactly a year ago that i featured the work of artist Winnie Truong. her most recent body of work Rites of Passage has just opened at Gallery Benoni in Copenhagen, playfully exploring the feeling of age and the precariousness of time.

Rites of Passage explores the transition from youth to oblivion. The subjects in her portraits are poised for no specific occasion, neither celebrating nor lamenting their experience of humanity and death. With the experience of getting older, personality and psyche are in a state of flux, making the feelings of growth and decay simultaneous and ambiguous. The rites of passage then become unclear, leaving mortality to be donned and adorned by these characters merely as ornament.

Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong

 

 

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Emily Ferretti

i love the cool hued work of Aussie artist Emily Ferretti. she is represented by the Sophie Gannon Gallery. these pieces also appear in her book!

Ferretti’s oil-on-linen paintings of plants, rocks, domestic settings, sporting ephemera and architectural details are remarkable for their lightness of touch and subtleties in process, tonality and mark making, sidling the representational and abstract via a quiet, poetic tenor. Isolated from wider narrative and context, her various fragmentary scenes – athletic tracks, skate ramps, pot plants or winter forest scapes – work to bestow the day-to-day with a particular gravity and significance.

Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti

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