artist

François Henri Galland

last week i hung some pictures in our apartment. Anton has lived there since 2010 and i moved in a few years ago – and till last week there were hardly any pictures up. which is crazy, right? considering how much i love art and surrounding myself with it. i guess it’s harder when there are two of you, and you have to compromise on what both of you like (and where it should go!) anyway now that those first few pics are up things are starting to snowball, and my thoughts are occupied with filling all the blank spaces.

i want to find something awesome for above our bed – and i’m vacillating between some smaller pictures or one HUGE piece that can fits over the entire headboard. when i saw these images by artist François Henri Galland i thought they would look amazing on a massive scale. they are also just the right amount of  dreamy and unnerving.

François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland
François Henri Galland

7

Isca Greenfield-Sanders

Isca Greenfield-Sanders encapsulates summer and nostalgia in her paintings. she finds, scans, edits, and prints vintage photographs, alters them with watercolour and pencil, then mounts details from the images onto tiles before, finally, painting over them in oils.

Her primary interest is the figured landscape and its relationship to memory—how universally recognizable places (beaches, family picnics, poolside scenes) can evoke both deeply personal and communal associations and a sense of foreboding.

all images courtesy of Artsy

Isca Greenfield-Sanders Isca Greenfield-Sanders Isca Greenfield-Sanders Isca Greenfield-Sanders Isca Greenfield-Sanders Isca Greenfield-Sanders Isca Greenfield-Sanders Isca Greenfield-Sanders

3

Lucie de Moyencourt

while i was enjoying the new Pichulik website yesterday i particularly loved their Brave Women series – intimate portraits of the women who wear Pichulik pieces. the first feature is on Lucie de Moyencourt who works as an architect, set designer, illustrator and painter.

lucie de moyencourt was born in 1983 in paris, she grew up in south africa, where she works as an architect, set designer, illustrator and painter. with no formal art training, painting and drawing is something lucie has always done for herself. by observing her subjects very closely, she allows the brush to move around the canvas without giving it much thought, trusting that her hand will do something intuitive to what she is seeing. lucie aims to complete a painting in one sitting, and enjoys working into wet paint with thicker layers of colour. “i paint because i am addicted to the ‘surprise’ that the painted canvas gives me when i step back from the easel”.

STORY: Pichulik. STILLS: Tommaso Fiscaletti. VIDEO: Johnathan Mellish. ART: Lucie de Moyencourt

Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt Pichulik Brave Women: Lucie de Moyencourt

7

Alex Katz

inspired by the print work of artist Alex Katz today, which spans from the late 40s to the present day. you can see his entire impressive archive here.

Katz has admitted to destroying a thousand paintings during his first ten years as a painter in order to find his style. Since the 1950s, he worked to create art more freely in the sense that he tried to paint “faster than he can think.” His works seem simple, but according to Katz they are more reductive, which is fitting to his personality.

Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz Alex Katz

4

Winnie Truong

it’s always wonderful to see what can happen in a year, and it was almost exactly a year ago that i featured the work of artist Winnie Truong. her most recent body of work Rites of Passage has just opened at Gallery Benoni in Copenhagen, playfully exploring the feeling of age and the precariousness of time.

Rites of Passage explores the transition from youth to oblivion. The subjects in her portraits are poised for no specific occasion, neither celebrating nor lamenting their experience of humanity and death. With the experience of getting older, personality and psyche are in a state of flux, making the feelings of growth and decay simultaneous and ambiguous. The rites of passage then become unclear, leaving mortality to be donned and adorned by these characters merely as ornament.

Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong Winnie Truong

 

 

4

Emily Ferretti

i love the cool hued work of Aussie artist Emily Ferretti. she is represented by the Sophie Gannon Gallery. these pieces also appear in her book!

Ferretti’s oil-on-linen paintings of plants, rocks, domestic settings, sporting ephemera and architectural details are remarkable for their lightness of touch and subtleties in process, tonality and mark making, sidling the representational and abstract via a quiet, poetic tenor. Isolated from wider narrative and context, her various fragmentary scenes – athletic tracks, skate ramps, pot plants or winter forest scapes – work to bestow the day-to-day with a particular gravity and significance.

Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti

7

365 Postcards for Ants

Lorraine Loots is an artist based in Cape Town who wrapped a highly successful project called 365 Paintings for Ants at the end of 2013. as you can guess from the title, Lorraine painted a tiny painting every day for 365 days and, well, you have hopefully seen that scene which explains the name.  she posted a painting every day on Tumblr and Instagram (where you can browse all 365 paintings in the archive). most of the time the subject stemmed from her own imagination, but as it gained momentum people booked dates that were special to them and commissioned paintings, like this portrait of Ron Swanson painted for a couple who got engaged after an episode of Parks and Recreation.

i enjoyed seeing such a talented person’s dedication to her work being celebrated in local blogs and magazines, and all over social media, and i wondered what Lorraine was going to do when she had finished. well, she’s not stopping. 365 Postcards for Ants is the next phase of the project, celebrating Cape Town in honour of it being the 2014 World Design Capital.

be sure to read this wonderful interview by Lior Phillips to learn more about Lorraine and her work. you can follow the new project on her Instagram & Tumblr and you can also book a painting if you’d like to own one of these tiny delights.

paintings c/o Lorraine Loots. video by Gareth Pon. photographs by Frances Marais for MBLife.

Lorraine Loots // Paintings for Ants

Lorraine Loots photographed by Frances Marais Lorraine Loots photographed by Frances Marais Lorraine Loots photographed by Frances Marais

19

Helen Frankenthaler

today i’m inspired by the work of legendary abstract expressionist Helen Frankenthaler. her huge colourful paintings look like gigantic watercolours, but are in fact painted with oils & acrylics. Helen would work directly on unprepared canvas, and dilute the oil paint with turpentine (later she switched to acrylic paint), causing it to soak into the canvas – a technique called “soak stain” that was later adopted by other abstract expressionists like Jackson Pollock. her work was not highly gestural and painterly, instead she preferred to create pieces that looked as if they were “born in a minute”.

A really good picture looks as if it’s happened at once. It’s an immediate image. For my own work, when a picture looks labored and overworked, and you can read in it – well, she did this and then she did that, and then she did that – there is something in it that has not got to do with beautiful art to me. … I think very often it takes ten of those over-labored efforts to produce one really beautiful wrist motion that is synchronized with your head and heart, and you have it, and therefore it looks as if it were born in a minute.

What concerns me when I work, is not whether the picture is a landscape, or whether it’s pastoral, or whether somebody will see a sunset in it. What concerns me is – did I make a beautiful picture?

Helen was born and raised in New York, and was celebrated in the NYC art scene since her debut in the 50s.  she produced work until her death in 2011 (you can read her obituary at the New York Times), and apart from her painting she also created lithographs, etchings, screen prints and woodcuts. you can see her work at many institutions across the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, MOMA, the Guggenheim and the Centre Pompidou in Paris.

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Gordon Parks for Life Magazine

photographed by Gordon Parks for Life Magazine, 1956

Basque Beach, 1958 by Helen Frankenthaler

Basque Beach, 1958

Summer Scene Provincetown, 1961 by Helen Frankenthaler

Summer Scene Provincetown, 1961

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Ernst Haas
Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Ernst Haas

photographed in her studio by Ernst Haas

Flood, 1967 by Helen Frankenthaler

Flood, 1967

Tutti Fruitti, 1966 by Helen Frankenthaler

Tutti Fruitti, 1966

Helen Frankenthaler, photographer unknown

photographed by by Alexander Liberman

Nepenthe, 1972 by Helen Frankenthaler

Nepenthe, 1972

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by William Grigsby

photographed by William Grigsby in her home, 1967

Untitled, 1965 by Helen Frankenthaler

Untitled, 1965

Helen Frankenthaler by Alexander Liberman

photographed by Alexander Liberman

Persian Garden, 1965 by Helen Frankenthaler

Persian Garden, 1965

Portrait of Helen Frankenthaler in front of woodblock proofs for Essence Mulberry, 1977

Helen Frankenthaler in front of woodblock proofs for Essence Mulberry, 1977 photographed by Lindsay Green

Helen Frankenthaler Lithographs at MOM

lithographs in the collection of MOMA

Helen-Frankenthaler-Alexander-Liberman

in her studio by Alexander Liberman

Small Paradise, 1964 by Helen Frankenthaler

Small Paradise, 1964

Helen Frankenthaler by Michael Fredericks

photographed by Michael Fredericks

Snowpines, 2004 by Helen Frankenthaler

Snowpines, 2004

Helen Frankenthaler, Painted on 21st Street

Painted on 21st Street

Untitled, 1963 by Helen Frankenthaler

Untitled, 1963

Helen Frankenthaler, photographer unknown

photographed by Alexander Liberman

Indian Summer, 1967 by Helen Frankenthaler

Indian Summer, 1967

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Dan Budnick

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Dan Budnick

19