decor

Sheepskin

sheepskin is like the rug version of the birkenstock. it’s everywhere , and i love it. it’s one of those boho Megan-Draper’s-house-in-LA kind of thing that’s been around f-o-r-e-v-er (like macrame, or hand-woven tapestries) but now it’s ever so casually draped on a leather butterfly chair like it’s no big deal. oh that old thing? everyone is super cool about it.

i’ll never forget visiting friends of my parents when i was a kid, they had a mid-century modern house on a hill with a huge sheepskin rug that practically filled the lounge. i used to lie on that rug and dream about living in that house forever (they eventually sold it! waaah) perhaps one day we’ll have our own beautiful house, in which case i might get floor to floor sheepskin carpeting (not really, yes really). for now, here is some inspiration and places to buy sheepskin if you’re so inclined.

Sheepskin // Miss Moss

above sources: 1. Mark Neely and Paul Kefalides’ living room in Dwell // 2. Jessica Comingore’s home on Design Sponge // 3. Madelynn Furlong’s home on The Every Girl // 4. Jasmine & Justin’s home at Refinery29 // 5. Anna Liesemeyer’s home, In Honor of Design // 6. Wakako’s home, Modern Findings // 7. Home of Leah Bartholomew, The Design Files

and here’s where you can buy them! just click on the images to be taken to the shop. if you’re not into the real thing there are plenty of faux fur options around.

Sheepskin // Miss Moss

at Swedish Dala Horse

Sheepskin // Miss Moss

at Dwell Studio

Sheepskin // Miss Moss

at Idyll Home

Sheepskin // Miss Moss

at Black Sheep White Light

Sheepskin // Miss Moss

at Rockett St George

Sheepskin // Miss Moss

at Toast

Sheepskin // Miss Moss

at The Forest and Co

Sheepskin // Miss Moss

at Design Within Reach

Sheepskin // Miss Moss

at Bellacor

Sheepskin // Miss Moss

at Horchow

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LaMalconttenta

LaMalconttenta is a spanish brand by designer Lydia de la Piñera, who is one of those multi-talented people who illustrates, makes jewellery, ceramics and prints. you can buy all these sweet things at her online shop.

I studied graphic design artistic photography and digital media. However, I was always enjoyed the handcrafting process, that’s the reason why I Decided to mix design and traditional handcraft to tell her stories. The philosophy of The Malconttenta is to enjoy old traditions, nature, and share it with people.

LaMalconttenta
LaMalconttenta
LaMalconttenta
LaMalconttenta
LaMalconttenta
LaMalconttenta
LaMalconttenta
LaMalconttenta
LaMalconttenta
LaMalconttenta
LaMalconttenta

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Hirashima

we are thinking about a house. i mean, just starting the process… in our minds. i know it can take months or years for anything to come to fruition – and i always try to be pragmatic about these things and not get TOO excited (don’t go breakin’ my heart!) but everything inside me wants a little house somewhere. just a little garden and space for a dog and… other things that crawl around. i suppose that is the dream of anyone who grew up in the suburbs, and transplanted their adult life to a city – where space is limited and comes at a price. but sometimes i also think, well, we could live in an apartment forever.

and if we did, we’d just have to be clever about space. i thought about how possible it was when i saw this furniture by Japanese company Hirashima. if there are any people in the world who are very clever about space, and design, and minimalism – it’s the Japanese.

Hirashima Hirashima Hirashima Hirashima Hirashima Hirashima Hirashima Hirashima Hirashima Hirashima Hirashima Hirashima Hirashima

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Association

i distinctly remember really loving & pinning away the beautiful Portland home of John and Jen Vitale that was featured on Freunde von Freunden last year. so imagine my delight (more things ought to be delightful) when Jen emailed me about their new venture Association - a lifestyle shop that offers items made by their friends and fellow creatives.

Association is us. We collaborate with friends, fellow creatives and artists to offer you a carefully curated selection of unique, quality goods, both new and found, that are a reflection of a shared appreciation for living an intentional lifestyle.

you can browse their new launched online shop, which includes new and vintage goods like ceramics, apothecary, textiles, jewellery, vinyl and a small selection of clothing – notably these rad smocks (which you can see in the lookbook) by State The Label. they also sell their own brand of handmade cutting boards, leather wallets and driftwood + clay mobiles that are handmade by Jen & her husband John.

photography by Carissa Gallo.

Association // Miss Moss Association // Miss Moss Association // Miss Moss Association // Miss Moss Association // Miss Moss Association // Miss Moss Association // Miss Moss Association // Miss Moss Association // Miss Moss Association // Miss Moss Association // Miss Moss Association // Miss Moss

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California Dreaming

the latest issue of Kinfolk is dedicated to Home, and it is my favourite issue so far without a doubt. when it arrived i asked people on Instagram where they call home, and it’s amazing to see where all my readers are from – thank you!

one of my favourite stories was this feature on California couple Hannah Henderson, John Moore and their kids who live in a 1975 Venice Beach house, a short walk from the ocean and their shop General Store (see pics of their rad shop at Refinery29).

It’s very much a California boy and desert girl home. John is very connected to the ocean, and I’m influenced by my mom, who is a midwife in Arizona. She always had a great respect for everything natural like plants, sun and fabrics. You can see that in our house.

images & words courtesy of Kinfolk, buy the latest issue here. photos by We Are The Rhoads.

Kinfolk: California Dreaming. photography by We Are The Rhoads. Kinfolk: California Dreaming. photography by We Are The Rhoads. Kinfolk: California Dreaming. photography by We Are The Rhoads. Kinfolk: California Dreaming. photography by We Are The Rhoads. Kinfolk: California Dreaming. photography by We Are The Rhoads. Kinfolk: California Dreaming. photography by We Are The Rhoads. Kinfolk: California Dreaming. photography by We Are The Rhoads. Kinfolk: California Dreaming. photography by We Are The Rhoads. Kinfolk: California Dreaming. photography by We Are The Rhoads. Kinfolk: California Dreaming. photography by We Are The Rhoads. Kinfolk: California Dreaming. photography by We Are The Rhoads. Kinfolk: California Dreaming. photography by We Are The Rhoads. Kinfolk: California Dreaming. photography by We Are The Rhoads.

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New Friends

i briefly featured the work of NYC based New Friends, aka Alexandra Segreti and Kelly Rakowski, last year - but i thought they deserved their own post because their work is just soooooo good. they were also featured in the UO blog last month and i just loved seeing a little tour of their studio.

New Friends design and produce weavings, textiles and housewares. They weave unique objects that combine the rich history of textiles and contemporary visual culture. The fibers used in their vivid, oddball collections range from locally sourced, plant dyed wools to man-made metallic threads.

photography c/o New Friends, studio images c/o the UO Blog, photographed by Jody Rogac.

New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends

 

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Behind the Bed

we currently have this huuuge expanse of white wall behind our bed that’s so bare and sad. i’m just glad i can’t see it when i’m actually lying in bed. but we all know it’s there. what do do? hang a huge painting, perhaps? or lotsa little paintings? or drill some holes and put up a shelf? or a tapestry? or some cool wall sconces? or ALL OF THE ABOVE? we only have one bedroom, so we’re going to have to choose carefully…

source: hus & hem

source: phorm design life

source: objets mécaniques

source: atlanta homes & lifestyle

source: simon james design

source: des chaises en couleur

source: stadshem

source: sally england

source: my scandinavian home

source: david + sarah

source: joanna lavén

source: bolig

source: schoolhouse electric

source: elina dahl

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Chinese Money Plant

there are certain plants that continue to pop up in beautifully styled homes in magazines or blogs or instagram. first it was the delicious monster, then it was the fiddle leaf fig, and now it’s the Chinese Money Plant aka Pilea peperomioides. this is probably the most interesting one of them all, not just in looks but also because of the amazing story behind it.

the unusual little plant started popping up in households all over Britain in the seventies, which puzzled botanists as the species had not even been officially identified. eventually they traced the origin of the plant to a range of mountains in the Yunnan province of China. but HOW did it get to Britain? how indeed. in 1983 the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew published a newspaper article asking if anyone had any leads on the introduction of the plant, to which a family from Cornwall called the Sidebottoms (you can’t make this up) answered. their au pair Modil Wigg was from Norway, and their daughter Jill who had holidayed with the Wigg family had brought a plant home with her sometime in the 1960s. so, that traces the routes to Scandinavia, but HOW did it get there? turns out…

A Norwegian missionary, Agnar Espegren, brought the plant to Norway from China in 1946. In 1944 the Norwegian missionaries in China had had to leave. Agnar Espegren and his family, then living in Hunan province, were taken by an American plane to Kunming in Yunnan where they stayed about a week awaiting further transport to India. During this brief stay in Kunming Mr Espegren obtained a live specimen of the plant (possibly from a local market) and packed it in a small box, which was then brought together with his family and all their baggage to Calcutta where they stayed for nearly a year. The Espegren family arrived back in Norway in March 1946 with the plant miraculously still alive. Mr Espegren subsequently travelled widely in Norway and often gave basal shoots of the plant to friends. In this way the plant was effectively distributed around Norway where it is now widespread as a window sill plant, and where it is known as ‘the missionary plant’.

well, i suppose we must all thank Agnar Espegren, and 9-year-old Jill Sidebottom, for making this sweet little plant a still flourishing part of window sills all over Europe. i hope that i can find one in South Africa somewhere… anyone have any leads for me feel free to direct them my way (or i might be forced to publish a newspaper article).

photo by Mieke Verbijlen

photo by Mieke Verbijlen

photos by Frida Ramstedt for Trendenser

photos by Frida Ramstedt for Trendenser

photos by Bart Kiggen for All Items Loaded

photos by Bart Kiggen for All Items Loaded

photos by Amanda Wright

photos by Amanda Wright

photo by Belle Fleur de lis

photos by Belle Fleur de Lis

photo by Lisettes Perler

photo by Lisettes Perler

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