decor

Nemadji Pottery

one of the things i’d like to do at home is build up my ceramics & glassware collection. i’ve been buying a few knick knacks here and there, which is always a slow process as you tend to find them sporadically (and need to resist the urge to buy an entire collection that you won’t necessarily love years down the line). so when i spotted these colourful marbled pots on Etsy i kind of fell in love, and did a bit of reading up on their origin. found this little piece of Fab.com which explains,

Nemadji pottery is that early 20th century invention that somehow got mixed up with a Native American tribe. The Minnesota-based Nemadji pottery company began manufacturing this colorful, swirled pottery in 1929 and promoted it as being “Indian inspired.” Over the years, advertising became truth in the minds of many, leading to mistaken claims over authentic Native American pottery.

i would probably end up filling my house with these, if only i could get my hands on some locally. you can find them on Etsy and eBay – click on the pictures to be taken to the source (some of them are already sold, unfortunately!)

 

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Rugs not Drugs

first of all, i APOLOGISE for the title of this post. it could not be helped.

so, a difficult thing i had to do recently was help my boyfriend pick out a carpet (actually, rug) for his apartment. at one stage there were three HUGE beautifully colourful kilims on the floor of this old school carpet place we visited in cape town, and the carpet salesman was almost rolling his eyes at us as we umm’d and aah’d over which one he should take home. eventually after peeling away layers upon layers of piled up carpets he found the one. but i’m still thinking back to all those carpets, i honestly would have loved to take all of them home.

i’m also on the market for a carpet, and i thought i had a good idea of what i wanted until i came across the Nazmiyal Collection of vintage rugs boasting Swedish kilims, Moroccon rugs and some incredible Art Deco pieces too. do i want something fluffy? or Scandanavian? ideally i’d like all the rugs in the world, but if that’s not possible i could very happily live with one of these.

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Fantastic Frank

if you’re like me you probably like settling down with a cup of coffee and the weekend newspaper on a sunday morning and flip straight to the property section where you play the always fun game if i had a billion rand / dollars / pounds which house would i buy?

this game would be about 1000 times funner if the visuals in the property sections were on par with what’s going on at Fantastic Frank. this swedish real estate agency styles & photographs the homes in their property portfolio so beautifully that you’d want to move in right away.

A home is more than the size and space between the dwelling walls. Our minds are more affected by light and colors, the sounds and structures than of a designed chair. We feel good when we are inspired, when we feel that there is a purpose to what we surround ourselves with. When the home has a character we can have a relationship with it.

It is when you look at the property in nature as you can see who will live in the next. Therefore, when characterful homes passed, the goal is always to reach the few who love the home, rather than to reach very many people who just like it. It is the philosophy behind the way we convey housing, and that is why Fantastic Frank created.

all images courtesy of Fantastic Frank

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Visiting Amy

i’ve spoken about my friend Amy before on the blog – you’ll be familiar with her famous collages if you’re a regular visitor. she has the best taste out of any person i know, and that is a fact. some might say she taught me everything i know. so when Kate and i were musing about who she should do her next house call series on (she blogs for local site its what i’m into) i suggested amz, as she is currently living in a mega cute cottage in the seaside village of kalk bay.

amz has a knack for quickly making any space she occupies into a home – when we lived together in a tiny, tiny room in london (harry potter’s cupboard would not be an exaggeration) she managed to make it cosy & liveable. then later on when we shared a (luckily) bigger flat she filled it up with tons of beautiful wooden furniture – many of which were handmade by her dad. you can see some of his pieces in these photos, the kitchen table notably (love those tapered legs) as well as the laptop tray (brilliant) and the bedside lamp (i have on too).

read the entire post here and be sure to check out the rest of Kate’s house calls.

ps: the cute pooch goes by Sophie, and she is a Hungarian Viszla in case anyone is wondering.

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Humble Abode

my mind is occupied with two main obsessions at the moment: finding & wearing the perfect winter boot, and cooking up decorating schemes for my apartment. these are unrelated topics, yet inexplicably intertwined – as i plan on happily stomping around my flat while wearing said boots.

never mind the boots for now, let’s talk about those decor schemes.

art & shelving is the main thing on the agenda. my plan is thus: put a few BIG pictures on the walls (i have grown tired of gallery walls, which i used to have in my old apartment) – and i mean BIG. and then figure out some kind of shelving system i can use on one wall that can act as a gallery rail of sorts for a variety of smaller pictures.

this apartment is filled with HUGE paintings, some of which are super bright which i LOVE.

the example from this apartment is slightly smaller, but still big & bright enough to make a great impact:

two by two is cool too – i love the prints (and everything else) in anouck lepere’s apartment so much:

low hanging posters with some kind of shelving / storage system underneath = yes. i would steal the posters in this apartment (left) in a second, and love the contrast of that big white poster against the dark wall in this home (right):

which brings me to something else, creating an impact in your entryway – those low hooks are handy too:

as for shelving – this is a perfect example of using shelving to display pictures:

as is this:

if you’re looking for a way to do shelving yourself, check out these rad stirrup shelf brackets by Quarter Twenty – what an ingenious idea:

could also just nix the shelving and use a low bookshelf to display things:

something else i’ve been thinking about is how to bring more colour into the place. i have mostly wooden furniture, and a light grey couch – so things can get too neutral pretty easily. i like the idea of colourful glassware & ceramics… like this kumquat pitcher at anthropologie:

beautiful blenko glassware in this home:

fun colourful ceramics in this apartment:

an obvious way to bring in more colour is by using paint, even though it’s not something i really want to attempt in a rented apartment (if i ever own property one day i will probably go MAD with paint colours)

have come to adore a rosey blush pink – which needs to be accessorised correctly to avoid it becoming too girly:

another idea is painting the ceiling:

here are some other random interior things i like…

exquisite lighting by ania pauser:

this collage by erin dollar:

windowsill herb pots by nick fraser:

simple magazine rack by gauzak:

and, these hilarious salt & pepper penguins by holaria:

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Walls

i have come across two Paris based companies in the past week who create beautiful designs for your walls. Minakani Walls is a wallpaper company headed up by Frédéric Bonnin and Cécile Figuette (who are also textile designers) and Bartsch is a decorative painting company run by cousins Gala and Nicolas, who specialise in hand painted patterns for your kid’s walls.

Minakani:

Minakani is a Paris based studio. Frédéric Bonnin and Cécile Figuette create patterns, mainly for textile but not exclusively. They’ve launched their walldecor line 2 years ago and offer custom size and exclusive motifs printed onto high quality non-woven paper.

Bartsch:

Bartsch is a decorative painting workshop specializing in children’s rooms. Gala and Nicolas are cousins who have combined their skills to create collections of chic and playful patterns in their Parisian workshop. Bartsch, whose name comes from their great-grandfather, is the result of the relationship between graphic design and decorative painting. Each pattern is hand-painted directly on the wall. You can see the gesture and the brush strokes; you can feel the texture of the material.

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