drawing

Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter

can we all just take a moment for people who work on one thing for 2 whole months? that is exactly what Cape Town based artist Marsi van de Heuvel does. in her series Dark Matter Marsi explores space. not literally, but with her pen – at seven strokes per second.

I’ve had an interest in Space for as long as I can remember. I started collecting books on the theme, and made my first drawings of The Northern Sky and The Southern Sky about two years ago. Before I knew it, I was drawing every constellation, and the Earth, Sun, and Moon. Space consumed me.

Each pen stroke in my work is deliberately used to map out a representation of something infinitely bigger. It takes about two hours to draw a ten centimeter square, at a rate of about seven strokes per second. The largest drawing I’ve done to date in this technique, is Omega Centauri, the brightest star cluster in our galaxy. It took two months to complete.

The vastness of space helps me to put some perspective to our significance. Creating this work also showed me how extraordinary our home planet is – it is an oasis in a beautiful but hostile never-ending dessert. The idea of Space perpetually engages me as there is aways more to explore – it’s intangible and romanic, and reveals my unrequited love for a remarkable unemotional expanse of darkness.

the pieces are BIG, too! Omega Centauri (below) is 1 square meter in size. if i had one of these on my wall i would marvel at it constantly. you can purchase her work through Smith Studio.

Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter. this is drawn in pen, and took 2 months to complete.

Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter

Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter
Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter
Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter
Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter
Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter
Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter
Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter
Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter
Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter
Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter
Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter
Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter
Marsi van de Heuvel: Dark Matter

5

Miaow

i should start this post by saying that artistic depictions of cats go back as far as the Egyptians who- bla bla bla, but the point is cats are cool so of course why wouldn’t they appear in art since forever? what i realised after looking around for rad art that featured felines is that there are a lot of nudes + cats. this Picasso being perhaps the most explicit. is it because people tend to strut around their house naked, while their cats look on? i know i always did when my cat was still alive. and then you’d stop and look at the cat, who was looking at you, and you’d think… is it judging me or does it just not care? (a bit of both)

also check out Cats: Some people like them, and some do not.

Andy Warhol, Brown Sam with Orange Eyes, 1954

Andy Warhol, Brown Sam with Orange Eyes, 1954

Bill Vuksanovich, Moonie. (Pencil on Paper)

Bill Vuksanovich, Moonie, 1992. (pencil on paper)

Riña de Gatos, Cats on a Roof

Francisco de Goya, Cats on a Roof, 1786-1787

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Artistin Marcella, 1910

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Artistin Marcella, 1910

Alice Neel, Victoria and the Cat, 1981

Alice Neel, Victoria and the Cat, 1981

Przemek Matecki, Untitled

Przemek Matecki, Untitled, 2013

Jenny Morgan, Venus in Furs

Jenny Morgan, Venus in Furs, 2014

Taisei Yoshimura, Moment of Silence (Coloured Pencil)

Taisei Yoshimura, Moment of Silence, 2012 (coloured pencil)

Yana Movchan, Unexpected Guests

Yana Movchan, Unexpected Guests

Holly Coulis, Snowball

Holly Coulis, Snowball, 2007

Stephen Machey, An Unspeakable Fortune

Stephen Machey, An Unspeakable Fortune, 2013

Yago Partal, Cat

Yago Partal, Cat, 2013

Zinaida Serebriakova, Portrait of Natasha Lancere with a cat, 1924

Zinaida Serebriakova, Portrait of Natasha Lancere with a cat, 1924

Allison Schulnik, Cat Head, 2011

Allison Schulnik, Cat Head, 2011

Gideon Rubin, Black Cat, 2012

Gideon Rubin, Black Cat, 2012

10

Winnie Truong

Winnie Truong is a Canadian artist whose infinitely detailed drawings are absolutely beautiful and mesmerizing. she has just launched her latest series A Slow Immersion, which is currently showing at the ESP Gallery in Toronto.

The latest drawing series by Winnie Truong continues to explore the artist’s ongoing relationship with hair beyond beauty and accoutrement and into a direction of a object and environs. Through delicate, labor-intensive drawing, Truong’s anomalous subjects examine the possibility of hair as a veil and as an object of comfort, while also remaining a self-consuming and self-inspiring muse.

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Wil Freeborn

i will always remember my illustration lecturer at university telling us repeatedly that the best illustrators and comic book artists always had their sketchbook with them, and were always drawing. any spare moment was spent observing, sketching and perfecting their craft. that is of course completely true and a philosophy that certainly applies to any skill.

so i was immediately taken back to that classroom when i saw the pages of Wil Freeborn’s incredible sketchbooks. had mixed feelings of admiration and jealousy when browsing through these – what a talent.

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