found photos

Humans of Cape Town

today i was preparing to do a follow up to my Bygone Cape Town post from a few years back (be sure to check it out) when i went down a rabbit hole and discovered, to my delight, the archives of Bobby Graham whose father took photos of ordinary people in Cape Town from 1959 to 1963. by the end of it i had the biggest grin on my face, he really had a gift for capturing the natural sense of a person. thanks to his daughter for uploading & sharing.

see the entire set here.

People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town

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Circus Girls

looking through these photos made me realise that you have to be damn tough to be a Circus Girl. these were taken in 1949 by Nina Leen for LIFE.

Circus Girls, 1949
Circus Girls, 1949
Circus Girls, 1949
Circus Girls, 1949
Circus Girls, 1949
Circus Girls, 1949
Circus Girls, 1949
Circus Girls, 1949
Circus Girls, 1949
Circus Girls, 1949
Circus Girls, 1949
Circus Girls, 1949
Circus Girls, 1949
Circus Girls, 1949
Circus Girls, 1949

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LIFE visits Arrowhead Springs

i haven’t delved into the vast LIFE magazine archives in a while, so it was a pleasure to discover this amusing article showing “six healthy girls” from a Hollywood modeling agency visiting Arrowhead Springs in California in 1948.

Although they are naturally blessed with plenty of sunshine and cheap orange juice, Californians are notorious for their eagerness to find new ways of keeping healthy. Dotting the state are dozens of spas and resorts which advertise salutary baths, colonic treatments and curative waters. One of the flossiest of these is the Arrowhead Hot Springs Hotel, perched in the foothills of the San Bernardino Mountains, 65 miles east of Los Angeles. Recently six healthy girls from the Dorothy Preble model agency in Hollywood visited Arrowhead for a healthy holiday weekend. During their stay they boiled eggs in the hot springs, were daubed with Arrowhead mud, basked in underground steam caves and lolled in warm mineral baths containing traces of rare salts.

check out pics of the hotel, including that pool. original LIFE article here.

LIFE visits Arrowhead Springs, 1948.

Models kid themselves and the stiffly affected postures of their trade beside the scalloped, palm-bordered pool near the hotel. Their boss, Mrs Preble, remains unimpressed.

LIFE visits Arrowhead Springs, 1948.

Elisabeth Kellogg displays a terry-cloth bathing suit. Called a “stunner”, it is more practical for sunning than for swimming.

LIFE visits Arrowhead Springs, 1948.
LIFE visits Arrowhead Springs, 1948.

The girls boil their eggs in the “world’s hottest spring”.

LIFE visits Arrowhead Springs, 1948.
LIFE visits Arrowhead Springs, 1948.
LIFE visits Arrowhead Springs, 1948.

Frolicking in the salutary waters of hot mineral baths at Arrowhead Hot Springs Hotel.

LIFE visits Arrowhead Springs, 1948.

A mock fashion show is put on by Elisabeth Kellogg. Holding a flower for a prop, she parodies one of the stilted stances she is paid to use on work days.

LIFE visits Arrowhead Springs, 1948.

A pillow fight breaks out after breakfast, which the models had served in bed.

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Colby College Mountain Day

one thing i can never resist when i am visiting someone’s home, even if it’s a stranger, is to flip through any photo albums that might be lying around. usually they’re of old photos – because, let’s face it, people don’t really put together physical photo albums anymore. everything is online, on facebook or in your instagram or flickr feed. that’s cool, i’m like that too. but i still revel in looking through photos, which i suppose is why i gravitate towards vintage photography.

this photo story taken by Yale Joel for Life Magazine in 1950 shows the ladies of Colby College on their annual Mountain Day hike – a tradition that started in the 1850s and continues to this day. the college is located in the scenic Lake Sunapee Region of central New Hampshire, and the mountain they climb is Mount Kearsarge. the ladies look pretty grand in their 50s denim, flannel shirts and jaunty neck-ties.

edit: Colby College is now called Colby-Sawyer College, the name was changed in 1975. i have, however kept the name of the original Life Magazine article.

















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1890 Spindrift Drive

i was digging around in the Life Magazine archives (as i often do) when i came across these photos of a beautiful modern beach house in the La Jolla shores area of San Diego. after doing a bit of research i learned that it was designed by american architect William Kesling for Walton MacConnell in 1946-47. amazingly the original address is actually listed, so i looked it up on google maps – and it seems like some of the original part of the house might still be in existence! though it looks to have been extended on a massive scale.

i find that so unfortunate about beach properties these days, i know that it’s prime real estate and only super rich people can really afford them – and they have all the money to build super huge mansions – but it’s a shame to me that you don’t often see the small, charming beach cottages that were built back in the 40s, 50s, 60s… there are still a handful of them in Cape Town, you can spot a few original bungalows on the shores of Clifton and Camps Bay beaches. i hope that their owners never turn them into monstrous mansions.

anyhoo! these are nice pics to look at anyway. they were taken in 1947 by Peter Stackpole and featured in the November 3 issue of Life Magazine, pages 154-160. it all sounds pretty amazing… except maybe for that Cuban houseboy. here are some of my favourite bits:

With a Cuban houseboy, a barbeque pit, a fishing rod and a telescope, retired bachelor Walton MacConnell has settled down in the elegant, sunny little town of La Jolla, California to a pleasant, lounging existence. As a setting for this life he has built himself a dramatic, glossy, $40,000 home which hugs the edge of a 50-foot seaside cliff. Here the Pacific swishes around under the living-room floor and occasionally splashes up soothingly over the huge windows.

In the living room his guests loll around, waiting until nightfall when they usually dress formally for a dance in the cliff-enclosed patio.

At night, when there is no reflection, the living room window is invisible and MacConnell worries constantly lest unsuspecting guests walk right through it. So far several have hit it but none has been hurt.

On the bedroom roof guest Nancy Chase snoozes. Roofing of asphalt and crushed ceramics reflects extra sun for an even tan.

you can read the original article at the bottom of the post.















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