found photos

Colby College Mountain Day

one thing i can never resist when i am visiting someone’s home, even if it’s a stranger, is to flip through any photo albums that might be lying around. usually they’re of old photos – because, let’s face it, people don’t really put together physical photo albums anymore. everything is online, on facebook or in your instagram or flickr feed. that’s cool, i’m like that too. but i still revel in looking through photos, which i suppose is why i gravitate towards vintage photography.

this photo story taken by Yale Joel for Life Magazine in 1950 shows the ladies of Colby College on their annual Mountain Day hike – a tradition that started in the 1850s and continues to this day. the college is located in the scenic Lake Sunapee Region of central New Hampshire, and the mountain they climb is Mount Kearsarge. the ladies look pretty grand in their 50s denim, flannel shirts and jaunty neck-ties.

edit: Colby College is now called Colby-Sawyer College, the name was changed in 1975. i have, however kept the name of the original Life Magazine article.

















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1890 Spindrift Drive

i was digging around in the Life Magazine archives (as i often do) when i came across these photos of a beautiful modern beach house in the La Jolla shores area of San Diego. after doing a bit of research i learned that it was designed by american architect William Kesling for Walton MacConnell in 1946-47. amazingly the original address is actually listed, so i looked it up on google maps – and it seems like some of the original part of the house might still be in existence! though it looks to have been extended on a massive scale.

i find that so unfortunate about beach properties these days, i know that it’s prime real estate and only super rich people can really afford them – and they have all the money to build super huge mansions – but it’s a shame to me that you don’t often see the small, charming beach cottages that were built back in the 40s, 50s, 60s… there are still a handful of them in Cape Town, you can spot a few original bungalows on the shores of Clifton and Camps Bay beaches. i hope that their owners never turn them into monstrous mansions.

anyhoo! these are nice pics to look at anyway. they were taken in 1947 by Peter Stackpole and featured in the November 3 issue of Life Magazine, pages 154-160. it all sounds pretty amazing… except maybe for that Cuban houseboy. here are some of my favourite bits:

With a Cuban houseboy, a barbeque pit, a fishing rod and a telescope, retired bachelor Walton MacConnell has settled down in the elegant, sunny little town of La Jolla, California to a pleasant, lounging existence. As a setting for this life he has built himself a dramatic, glossy, $40,000 home which hugs the edge of a 50-foot seaside cliff. Here the Pacific swishes around under the living-room floor and occasionally splashes up soothingly over the huge windows.

In the living room his guests loll around, waiting until nightfall when they usually dress formally for a dance in the cliff-enclosed patio.

At night, when there is no reflection, the living room window is invisible and MacConnell worries constantly lest unsuspecting guests walk right through it. So far several have hit it but none has been hurt.

On the bedroom roof guest Nancy Chase snoozes. Roofing of asphalt and crushed ceramics reflects extra sun for an even tan.

you can read the original article at the bottom of the post.















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Super Duper Bomba

when i’m feeling low all it takes is a quick browse of superbomba’s legendary collection to perk the spirits.

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More Moxette

there have been many great additions to Moxette’s vintage photos since the last time i shared her wonderful collection

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the dead photog project

i think it goes without saying how much i love the dead photographers project

Deadphotographers is a forever expanding collection of images which explore the relationship of photography and our changing time while aiming to prove the theory that everyone has a good photograph in them. The project is curated by James Dodd, a UK based photographer, who uses his father’s removals company as the only source of discovering the photographs.

Each photograph is collected through house clearances of the deceased, where unwanted items are discarded, including whole photography archives of the once keen photographers. The experience, skills and styles of the photgraphers range vastly. But with most there is a sense of love of their subjects and of the activity they once pursued.

Most collections are cared for, dated and ordered to some level, and kept securely, only to see them quickly discarded along with other once loved trinkets as soon as they pass. If they didn’t become part of this collection, they would simply be disposed of and never see the light of day again.

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salon

not the kind you have tea in. this is a french hair salon in the 1920s. look at that one lady’s locks!

all images from the collection of cardboy

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moxette’s vintage photos

i smiled all the way through chris moxey‘s collection of found vintage photos

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these people are older than you

more ridiculous vintage radness from the swapatorium

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