ghana

YEVU

i love the internet for just this reason: discovering a Ghanaian inspired fashion label, started by an Australian print lover, thanks to a recommendation from an Aussie internet friend, who i have never met, and now lives in London. YEVU was started by Anna Robertson who, after a year of living in Ghana, decided to bring the vibrant West African textiles to her home town of Sydney. she was particularly inspired by the print-on-print aesthetic of the locals, who aren’t afraid to be bold in their sartorial choices.

YEVU is a brand that was inspired by, and developed in Ghana in 2013. The idea was to celebrate and harness the beauty of West African wax prints and the craftsmanship of Ghanaian tailors and seamstresses, to create unique and fun apparel that fit the lifestyle of my friends in Summer in Sydney. Each piece is unique. The fabrics were hand picked from the markets of Accra, Kumasi, Togo and Cote d’Ivoire. Each garment has been constructed by hand in Accra in collaboration with local businesses. Its an ethically produced range which attempts to connect the buyer with the marketplace of West Africa.

you can follow along on their tumblr and instagram, and also read a great interview with Anna about the label here. and in case you were wondering, Yevu is the word for white person or foreigner in a Ewe, the language of the Volta region in Ghana.

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hup holland, i’m never ghana give you up

football fever is still going – it’s the netherlands vs brazil in just 15 minutes time, and ghana vs urugay tonight. as you may have guessed i’m rooting for holland (my extended family are kaaskoppe hehe) and ghana (viva afrika). i’m also supporting germany because of even more familial connections; they’ll be playing argentina in cape town on saturday, what a game that’s going to be! i would be a bit disappointed if it ended up being just south american teams in the world cup… but i’m still going to enjoy this tournament to the very end no matter what the outcome.

images from the daily maverick

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ghana film posters

In the 1980s video cassette technology made it possible for “mobile cinema” operators in Ghana to travel from town to town and village to village creating temporary cinemas.  In order to promote these showings, artists were hired to paint large posters of the films & were given the artistic freedom to paint the posters as they desired – often adding elements that weren’t in the actual films, or without even having seen the movies.

via ephemera assemblyman

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