hand-woven

Voices of Industry

Adele Stafford is the creative mind behind Voices of Industry, who create hand woven apparel and textiles from 100% domestic fiber, farmed and spun in the U.S. Adele hand weaves each piece on a mechanical loom from her studio in Oakland, California and works with a small team of pattern makers and tailors in San Francisco. which is pretty amazing if you consider that almost 98% of all clothing in the US is made internationally. it’s people like Adele & her team who are steadily bringing that number down (and creating beautiful garments at that).

We consider the farmers that produce our cotton and wool as co-conspirators and friends. We invest in the independent grower, the bio-dynamic alchemist and the punk rock shepherdess. We know that cloth is a direct extension of agriculture and we care, deeply, about that origin. We strive to make exceptional cloth, hand woven on a mechanical loom and finished by skilled pattern makers and tailors. Our process is time consuming and choreographic and we believe that this is evident in our foot-treadled twills and french seams.

their first collection was inspired by Sally Fox, farmer, breeder and pioneer of the organic, naturally colored cotton that we used to weave each piece of this collection. Photographed by Brian Ferry in Oakland and Capay valley, California with assistance from Valeda Beach Stull. Pattern making and cut + sew by Danielle Colen. Modeled by Afton Love. Muslin jumpsuit + white kimono dress courtesy of Small Trade Company. Grey wool skirt by Ali Golden.

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Native Line

i’ve noticed a popular resurgence in hand weaving the past while, especially in the realm of wall hangings. i’m sure you’ve seen beautiful tapestries featured on design blogs (the stunning work of Brook&Lyn comes to mind) or cropping up on pinterest. if you’re a fan, like me, then you can add another talented artist to your most wanted weavers list – Justine Ashbee.

with a background as a fine artist known for her intricate pen drawings, she recently expanded her talents into woven pieces, wearable jewelry, hanging light sculptures and wall hangings – all of which stem from her early explorations in weaving metal sculptures as a textiles student. she collects her work and inspirations on her website Native Line.

Native Line consists of one off woven pieces, wearable jewelry, hanging light sculptures, & wall hangings, all of which stem from her early explorations in weaving metal sculptures, as a textiles student, at the Rhode Island School of Design. Inspired by the timeless motifs of indigenous woven craft work, Justine combines geometric lines with shimmering metals, to create luminary pieces of woven art, whether for your wall, or to wear as every day statement pieces.

you can buy Justine’s handwoven wall hanging objects at her online shop.

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Barena Venezia

i haven’t been able to get the spring lookbook for Barena Venezia out of my mind since spotting it at Honey Kennedy yesterday. Jen and i were actually swooning over it on twitter too, and we might have gone off on a tangent about bearded men and Roman gods… and bearded men as Roman gods (or in this case, Venetian gods). but please, don’t get side tracked. i need you to focus here.

the name ‘Berena’ comes from the Venetian term ‘baro’ which describes the territory of the Venetian lagoon between the land and water. in ancient times people in the baro traditionally wore versatile and functional clothing since they were farmers, hunters and fisherman – creating a distinctive style unique to the area.

The Barena collection is in fact inspired by the peculiar dress code created and used by the people who lived in these areas. Many of the garments in the collection are the reinterpretation of unique pieces found in museums, antique markets or books that portray old images. In fact, many of the wools specifically reproduced for the Barena collection, come from the archives of the most prestigious mills in Veneto, no longer in activity. Specific focus is given to construction details which make the garments unique in their simplicity.

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Oyyo

Oyyo is a studio based in Sweden founded by creative duo Lina Zedig and Marcus Åhrén, who marry Swedish design sensibilities with their nomadic moods and travelling adventures. the studio releases one to two new products per year to work up a core collection of textiles, pieces of furniture and accessories. their first collection is Oyyo No.1, a series of six original dhurries handwoven by a community of craftspeople near India’s Blue City, Jodhpur.

Uniquely made from 100% organic cotton and vivid vegetable dyes derived from local plants, our dhurries are conceived as timeless self-investment pieces providing comfort of the best possible quality out there. The dhurries are woven with techniques dating back centuries, devoid of machines, but with a contemporary design and colour pallet. Their carefully selected colours and exquisite patterns become a statement of Oyyo’s natural optimism and core values: We claim a re-engagement with the natural world and express our confidence in the productive wonders made possible thanks to cultural diversity.

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