Living

Artists’ Handmade Houses

Artists’ Handmade Houses is a collection of 13 homes handcrafted by the finest artists and craftsmen in America, including George Nakashima, Henry Varnum Poor, Sam Maloof, Wharton Esherick, and Russel Wright. Built over the course of 75 years, from the late-19th century to the mid-20th century, these homes were each designed and built by the artists as an expression of their aesthetic sentiments, and in many cases, as extensions of their artwork. As such, these private domains are utterly unique and deeply imbued with each artist’s singular vision and talent. Photography by Don Freeman.

photos courtesy of pdn photo of the day, dwell and amazon

14

Dark as the Night

i’ve spoken about the fact that i love white walls & have never ventured into colour territory when it comes to the walls in my home. right now i’m living with a carefully pale green in the flat i’m renting, which i loathe. more and more i’ve come to realise that i deliberately make my bedroom as dark as i can – with the help of a handy block out blind (thanks landlord) and curtains that are usually always drawn. since i spend most of my time in the bedroom in the evenings, i like it to be dark, warm and cosy – not light and bright enough that i can tweeze my eyebrows or perform surgery (as you do).

the thought of painting an entire wall in a deep dark navy or a warm grey is simultaneously tempting and scary.

– via brides.com

– via airspaces

– via designsponge + emmas designblogg

– via moodboard

– via ideas to steal + emmas designblogg

– via lonny

– via interiors porn + apartment therapy

– via sfgirlbay + pitch design union

8

The Smithy

i know i throw about the term dream house pretty often, but The Smithy ticks all the boxes to qualify for ultimate dream house or even ultimate dream house that i’d like to retire in or perhaps ultimate dream getaway house that you only visit on the weekends so that it stays this clean & uncluttered. it’s a property in upstate new york that’s currently on the market (very clever to have a nice looking website to advertise your property, mmm?) thanks to lena for posting about it and also pointing out that it is owned by jesse james, creative director of aesthetic movement.

7

Let’s live here

spotted Château de Moissac on Desire to inspire and it made me go uurrrrggghhhhnnnnnnn whhhhyyyyy! what kind of torture is this?? why is this not MY château! damn the world! – etc.

Built in a hill-top village, a refuge for lovers of ancient stones…In the early 17th century, the Château de Moissac-Bellevue was a residence dedicated to relaxation, owned by a noble family from Provence. Sober, patrimonial, remarkable, with its monumental entrance, vast drawing-rooms and dining-rooms opening out to the gardens, its imposing kitchen, its bedrooms and bathrooms extending upwards to the attics, the building was rewarded for its exemplary restoration in June 2008 by the “Prix des Vieilles Maisons Françaises” sponsored by Emile Garcin.

(i’d get rid of all those chandeliers though)

12

Environments

Environments is a book of photographs documenting studio spaces of eleven creative people, most of them working in and around Melbourne. the photography is by the talented Olga Bennett with interviews by Sarah Caldwell. you can buy the book here along with beautiful prints of the individual spaces.


1

Max Rollitt

my parents have bought antiques over anything new in the furniture department as far back as i can remember. when i was younger i thought it quite fuddy duddy and would roll my eyes like any good teenager when they spoke about yellowwood dining room tables and cape dutch food cupboards. fortunately i grew up and came to cherish and appreciate these things, and it has certainly influenced what kind of pieces i would choose today.

which is why i’m quite taken with the portfolio of max rollitt, a dealer & restorer of antiques as well as a trained furniture designer & maker whose company also specializes in bespoke furniture and interior design. be sure to check out the inspiration section, which has a pretty rad click through collage feature.

whenever i see an antique chair i can’t help but think of parson’s pleasure by roald dahl. i’ve read it so many times, and strangely always root for the antique dealer – even though i know i shouldn’t. oh, the ending makes me cringe.

9

Ford Wheeler is my hero

i hope you have seen the amazing amazing ny times feature on margaret howell – as it was deservedly reblogged all over the place recently. while i was over there spying on margaret for the millionth time, i decided to have a browse through some of their other style features (something i don’t do often enough, and should do because the ny times style magazine is truly great) – that’s when i spotted this feature on production designer ford wheeler.

wow. if ever there was someone whose aesthetic is the complete opposite of margaret – it’s ford wheeler. these photos show the interiors of his NYC loft, his country compound in upstate new york & his house in mérida, mexico.

The loft is assemblage in the extreme. The layers are amazingly dense. Everywhere, curious objects are clustered into vignettes, and each one has a story to tell. “Collecting is kind of like drugs for some people,” he once said. “It can be hard to determine when it is just too much.”

also thought this tied in nicely with the potted post from yesterday – look at the plant collection in his loft! i have to thank you all for your amazingly helpful comments, by the way… will let you know when i venture into potted territory.

ps: the selby did a feature on ford wheeler last year – go see his NYC loft in more detail.

story & images from the ny times style magazine

12

Potted

budget. i hate that word. my financial methodology is more along the lines of “try to be sensible and then hope for the best.” i’m not a planner by any means. i don’t, for instance,  make lists when i go to the grocery store (that’s why all those tins of stuffed olives keep cropping up in the fridge.) but, i do keep the financial lessons learnt from my parents fresh in my mind – my mom still has her little notebooks where she wrote down every single thing they spent money on as a young couple starting out. they even made their own beer. how’s that for thrifty, eh?

the reason i’m talking about budgets is because i want to make my home look a little bit nicer. but how! right now i’m living with my two friends who are similarly budget minded, and we’re trying to deal with a dining room that is sparse and empty. “maybe we should put some art on the walls” – we muse. actually, that is a good idea (my bedroom already has nil wall space left due to this.) but you know what else is a good idea? PLANTS.

i am a bit obsessed with the idea of indoor plants right now. anyone have tips for venturing into this territory? nice plants that won’t die too easily… succulents? i do love the look of them, but also don’t want our place to look like a desert garden conservatory (or do i?) also we don’t get an awful lot of sunlight in most of the flat unfortunately, so i think our future plants would have to be okay with that.

botany factory

the selby

old brand new

{joojoo}

old faithful shop

old chum

the brick house

44