mid-century modern

Modern Findings

i am so jealous of Wakako’s home, which you can see in full at her house tour. she has a blog called Modern Findings that details her love for mid-century modern design, something that is clearly reflected in this beautiful space.

all images by Modern Findings

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Raymond Loewy House, Palm Springs

i was browsing through my brother’s huge collection of architectural inspiration when i came across the Raymond Loewy House designed by Albert Frey. Raymond Loewy was an industrial designer notable for his work on the coca-cola bottle, the shell logo, the lucky strike pack and many other iconic designs. he even appeared on the cover of Time in 1949. so i guess it goes without saying that such a brilliant creative mind would live in an equally brilliant creative home.

Designed by Palm Springs architect Albert Frey, built in 1946-47 as a bachelor retreat, and expanded later when Loewy got married. Loewy’s home is a typical Palm Springs modernist villa with a low-slung pavilion and plenty of glass providing striking views of desert, mountains, and the pool and garden… making the private oasis complete. Loewy despised “bad modern” design, especially furniture, so the size, shape, and rooms of the home and furnishings were kept simple and spare. It is a demure house of small size but generous impact.

quote & images courtesy of  Faustian Urge

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The home of Børge Mogensen

i haven’t been able to get the home of famed Danish furniture designer Børge Mogensen out of my mind all week. i keep going back to Bo Bedre to look at all the rooms and oooooh over the light, the furniture & all the wood detailing. the kitchen is over 50 years old and the cabinets look like they were installed yesterday. in the future when i wince at the price of a beautiful piece of furniture or get quoted something crazy for custom cabinetry i’ll remember this house and how quality keeps for decades. might have to steal his framing idea, too…

all images courtesy of Bo Bedre

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Gubi Design Icons

these days there’s plenty of fantasising about my new (imaginary and still undiscovered) place going on, which means i’m browsing a lot of websites related to furniture, lighting and all sorts of other fancy designers things that are all completely out of my price range. that’s why it’s called fantasising, guys.

one of them is Gubi – a Danish company that was established in 1976 who has the production rights for various products by design icons from the thirties to the present day. you can browse this collection in their beautiful publication Design Icons Through Time (they also have a magazine and some nifty posters available for download)

The Grossman Collection design by Greta Grossman

The most iconic products Greta Grossman designed in the 40’s and 50’s were the Grasshopper floor lamp and the Cobra floor and table lamps. In 1950, the Cobra lamp won the Good Design Award and was subsequently exhibited at the Good Design Show at the Museum of Modern Art.

The Pedrera Collection designed by Barba Corsini & Joaquim Ruiz Millet

in 1955, Barba Corsini, a leading functionalist architect, realised his contemporary vision through his renovation of the loft space and the furnishings he custom designed for “La Pedrera”. Antoni Gaudi, who originally designed “La Pedrera”, is generally considered the great master of Spanish Modernism but his unique body of work cannot be defined by any single style or simple classification.

The Semi Collection designed by Bonderup & Thorup

The Semi lamp was designed in 1968 as a product of the creative partnership between two architecture students, Claus Bonderup and Torsten Thorup. Reacting against the ‘cosy era’ that was dominating Denmark at the time, Bonderup and Thorup wanted to create a lamp that incorporated sharp, clean lines and a geometric shape. Their design was submitted for a competition at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture and won first prize.

The Adnet Collection designed by Jacques Adnet

In 1950, Adnet formed a partnership with the French fashion house, Hermes, where he developed a collection of leather-covered furniture and interior accessories, including a distinctive leather mirror with brass hinges. Besides the remarkable leather and brass details, the Adnet mirror is also unique as the strap that holds the mirror is in direct proportion to the dimension of the mirror.

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poster please

i would like this as a poster please

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evil people in modernist homes in popular films

this project by benjamin critten

… immediately made me think of this house

which was used as the basis for the house in charlie’s angels. do you remember? sam rockwell was wooing drew barrymore up until he revealed himself to be the bad guy and put her through a window…

and even after the fact i still wanted her to end up with him, because sam rockwell is awesome!

… anyway, one of the houses benjamin critten mentions in the publication is jackie treehorn’s place in the big lebowski (i can’t think of jackie treehorn without remembering that note he scribbled, makes me giggle every time.)

this is the sheats goldstein residence, which was designed by the same architect who was responsible for the chemosphere – john lautner.

the same house was incidentally also used in bandits (a completely underappreciated movie, in my opinion)

another of the films mentioned in the publication is diamonds are forever, which was partly filmed in the elrod house, designed by (you guessed it) john lautner.

AND he mentions twilight (not the silly vampire one) – which uses the jacobsen residence, also by lautner.

he also designed the house from a single man, which i was perving over a while back

not that anyone in the single man was particularly evil.

thus, my conclusion is that if i had to live in a movie i would want to be the bad guy because they are invariably the raddest characters and they get to live in the nicest houses.

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prefab house

i first saw this prefab house over at the selvedge yard, and had to dig into the life archives myself to check it out. what a dream! i would move in right away.

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the party

i will always love the party, mostly due to the fact that the phrase ‘birdie num num’ is a running joke in my family. second to peter sellers’ antics, the best thing about this film is the house where all the action goes down. as a kid i thought nothing was more glamorous than a house that had a water running through it (am i right?) … i still kind of think that! i also love the way sellers wanders around, completely out of place – i totally empathise with his party awkwardness… obviously the sixties vibe completely appeals to me as well. haven’t seen the party? do it.

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