painting

Liz Markus

when i first saw the work of Liz Markus i immediately thought of the portraiture of Slim Aarons, known for photographing the lifestyles of the rich and famous. and i wasn’t wrong, many of the paintings reference Aaron’s own photographs. they form part of her collection Town & Country. Markus applies acrylic wash to unprimed canvas, meaning the paint spreads as it dries – an unpredictable method of painting.

With her signature drips and washes and an eye for finely calibrated color, Markus thoughtfully renders this elite group of women who, through their innovation and intense ambition, have forever altered the course of American culture. This list includes such luminaries as Babe Paley, Nancy “Slim” Keith, and Aerin Lauder among others. While these women were often casually described as socialites, in reality, they used their position to manage a powerful network of people across the arts, fashion, and beauty industries.

her work is absolutely beautiful. i will just have to forever alter the course of American culture so that i, too, may have my portrait painted.

Liz Markus
Liz Markus
Liz Markus
Liz Markus
Liz Markus
Liz Markus
Liz Markus
Liz Markus
Liz Markus
Liz Markus
Liz Markus
Liz Markus
Liz Markus

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Jenny Prinn

i’m so into these abstract pieces by artist Jenny Prinn. you can buy them online here. i particularly love this one.

Jenny Prinn is an artist living and painting on the coast of Maine. She is intrigued by the fleeting moments and feelings in life that are often overlooked or forgotten. She’s not interested in recording the big events but, rather the small pulsing, transient moments and sensations that strike deep within our core for just a moment and then are gone. By working a canvas over the course of days and weeks she begins to capture the essence and electricity of these moments through the exploration of color, shape, texture and line.

Jenny Prinn
Jenny Prinn
Jenny Prinn
Jenny Prinn
Jenny Prinn
Jenny Prinn
Jenny Prinn
Jenny Prinn
Jenny Prinn
Jenny Prinn

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Miaow

i should start this post by saying that artistic depictions of cats go back as far as the Egyptians who- bla bla bla, but the point is cats are cool so of course why wouldn’t they appear in art since forever? what i realised after looking around for rad art that featured felines is that there are a lot of nudes + cats. this Picasso being perhaps the most explicit. is it because people tend to strut around their house naked, while their cats look on? i know i always did when my cat was still alive. and then you’d stop and look at the cat, who was looking at you, and you’d think… is it judging me or does it just not care? (a bit of both)

also check out Cats: Some people like them, and some do not.

Andy Warhol, Brown Sam with Orange Eyes, 1954

Andy Warhol, Brown Sam with Orange Eyes, 1954

Bill Vuksanovich, Moonie. (Pencil on Paper)

Bill Vuksanovich, Moonie, 1992. (pencil on paper)

Riña de Gatos, Cats on a Roof

Francisco de Goya, Cats on a Roof, 1786-1787

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Artistin Marcella, 1910

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Artistin Marcella, 1910

Alice Neel, Victoria and the Cat, 1981

Alice Neel, Victoria and the Cat, 1981

Przemek Matecki, Untitled

Przemek Matecki, Untitled, 2013

Jenny Morgan, Venus in Furs

Jenny Morgan, Venus in Furs, 2014

Taisei Yoshimura, Moment of Silence (Coloured Pencil)

Taisei Yoshimura, Moment of Silence, 2012 (coloured pencil)

Yana Movchan, Unexpected Guests

Yana Movchan, Unexpected Guests

Holly Coulis, Snowball

Holly Coulis, Snowball, 2007

Stephen Machey, An Unspeakable Fortune

Stephen Machey, An Unspeakable Fortune, 2013

Yago Partal, Cat

Yago Partal, Cat, 2013

Zinaida Serebriakova, Portrait of Natasha Lancere with a cat, 1924

Zinaida Serebriakova, Portrait of Natasha Lancere with a cat, 1924

Allison Schulnik, Cat Head, 2011

Allison Schulnik, Cat Head, 2011

Gideon Rubin, Black Cat, 2012

Gideon Rubin, Black Cat, 2012

10

Will Cotton

did you ever read the Faraway Tree series by Enid Blyton? they were possibly my favourite books as a child (except maybe for anything by Roald Dahl) and i was instantly transported back to the Land of Goodies when seeing these paintings by Will Cotton. of course like most children’s books in those days everything wasn’t always sunshine and rainbows – there was always a moral to the story, and if you overindulged you were likely to learn a good lesson. that sinister undercurrent is certainly present in Cotton’s depictions of pin-up models in sugary sweet settings that look like they’re decaying before your eyes.

Cotton starts his process by building maquettes in his New York studio to paint from. These can range from table-top scenery to life-sized sets occupied by models dressed in confectionary costumes that Cotton has created. Constructing these sets allows the artist to see surprising and often unexpected details, enabling him to recreate textures and details in such a way that viewing the works becomes a tactile experience. “Sweetness taken to an extreme degree, as it is in my paintings, becomes cloying, even repulsive and that’s where it gets interesting for me.”

his work is currently showing at the Ronchini Gallery in London, so if you’re in the area go check out the exhibition.

Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton
Will Cotton

7

Paintings of the Fens

Fred Ingrams is an artist who after working for many years in London as a painter, graphic designer & art director moved to Norfolk in the late 90s, where he recently became obsessed with painting an area known as The Fens – a marshy, flat region in the east of England. all descriptions of the area sound boring and dreary, but Ingram’s paintings are vibrant and interesting. see his Fens series at his blog and the rest of his work at his website.

The Fens are perhaps the least loved landscape in Britain. For some reason the flatness of this huge area of Eastern England does not capture the heart. It is a landscape that does not fit into the ideal of a rolling “green and pleasant land”. They are, on the other hand as flat as a billiard table and to most people, featureless and grim. The wind blows from from the east and is cold and nagging. The people who live there appear, like the wind, cold and unfriendly. It is for all these reasons I feel so at home painting in the Fens. As I sit and paint here, I am always struck by how few people inhabit this place. I am nearly always alone.

Paintings of the Fens
Paintings of the Fens
Paintings of the Fens
Paintings of the Fens
Paintings of the Fens
Paintings of the Fens
Paintings of the Fens
Paintings of the Fens

10

Alexia Vogel

i love these oil paintings by local artist Alexia Vogel.

Alexia Vogel is a recent Michaelis School of Fine Art graduate. She considers all of her paintings landscapes, even the most abstract ones. She works from old family photographs of landscapes which she feels are imbued with a romantic sentimentality. Her work is very personal, as she considers it the affect of these images, or the memory of them. - via 10and5

Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel
Alexia Vogel

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