Will Cotton

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did you ever read the Faraway Tree series by Enid Blyton? they were possibly my favourite books as a child (except maybe for anything by Roald Dahl) and i was instantly transported back to the Land of Goodies when seeing these paintings by Will Cotton. of course like most children’s books in those days everything wasn’t always sunshine and rainbows – there was always a moral to the story, and if you overindulged you were likely to learn a good lesson. that sinister undercurrent is certainly present in Cotton’s depictions of pin-up models in sugary sweet settings that look like they’re decaying before your eyes.

Paintings of the Fens

Paintings of the Fens

Fred Ingrams is an artist who after working for many years in London as a painter, graphic designer & art director moved to Norfolk in the late 90s, where he recently became obsessed with painting an area known as The Fens – a marshy, flat region in the east of England. all descriptions of the area sound boring and dreary, but Ingram’s paintings are vibrant and interesting. see his Fens series at his blog and the rest of his work at his website.

Alexia Vogel

Alexia Vogel

i love these oil paintings by local artist Alexia Vogel.

Alexia Vogel is a recent Michaelis School of Fine Art graduate. She considers all of her paintings landscapes, even the most abstract ones. She works from old family photographs of landscapes which she feels are imbued with a romantic sentimentality. Her work is very personal, as she considers it the affect of these images, or the memory of them. – via 10and5

Kim McCarty

Kim McCarty

i love the watercolours of artist Kim McCarty.

Working rapidly, at times using only a single color and at others a haunting, bruise-inspired palette of acid yellows, greens, and browns, McCarty’s portraits evoke the sense of uncertainty, ambivalence, anxiety, and loss with which we view today’s generation.

Isca Greenfield-Sanders

Isca Greenfield-Sanders

Isca Greenfield-Sanders encapsulates summer and nostalgia in her paintings. she finds, scans, edits, and prints vintage photographs, alters them with watercolour and pencil, then mounts details from the images onto tiles before, finally, painting over them in oils.

Conrad Jon Godly

Conrad Jon Godly

it amazes me what some people can do with paint. the feeling of rock and cold and mist and altitude that these pieces by Swiss artist Conrad Jon Godly convey is just unbelievable.

Jaclyn Conley

Jaclyn Conley

the current exhibition over at Buy Some Damn Art features work by canadian artist Jaclyn Conley. whenever i’m faced with the “what would you do if you had a million dollars?” question i always fantasise about investing in a lot of great art. but, you and i can do that right now – that’s where Buy Some Damn Art comes in. i love these pieces by Jaclyn, i think they would be a fine addition to my imaginary collection. you can read an interview with here.

Helen Frankenthaler

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by William Grigsby

today i’m inspired by the work of legendary abstract expressionist Helen Frankenthaler. her huge colourful paintings look like gigantic watercolours, but are in fact painted with oils & acrylics. Helen would work directly on unprepared canvas, and dilute the oil paint with turpentine (later she switched to acrylic paint), causing it to soak into the canvas – a technique called “soak stain” that was later adopted by other abstract expressionists like Jackson Pollock. her work was not highly gestural and painterly, instead she preferred to create pieces that looked as if they were “born in a minute”.