Photography

Floralia

Artsy is fast becoming one of my favourite daily internet check-ins. i’ve discovered so many artists that i probably would never have known about otherwise thanks to it. besides the clean & beautiful design, i’m also quite taken by the fact that you can log in and favourite pieces as you go down the Artsy rabbit hole.

Artsy’s mission is to make all the world’s art accessible to anyone with an Internet connection. We are an online platform for discovering, discussing, and collecting art. Our growing collection comprises 30,000+ artworks by 6,000+ artists from leading galleries, museums, private collections, foundations, and artists’ estates spanning diverse cultures and time periods.

as an art / gallery / museum lover it’s such a treat to have something like this at my fingertips. i thought i’d do a series of art-related posts to share my Artsy finds, instead of doing just one big visual dump. first up, some floral inspiration (as last week’s post is still in my mind).


Sharon Core

Jeffrey Ripple

Amir H. Fallah

Susan Headly van Campen

Bruce Cohen

Georges Braque

Jane Freilicher

Daniel Gordon

Maurice Scheltens and Liesbeth Abbenes

Emil Nolde

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Warm Weather

it’s that time of year again where i do my annual post about summer psyching. this has mostly do with all the imagery i have seen on instagram and twitter and in my blog feed from people who live in, or are currently holidaying in, the northern hemisphere. i know you guys have been experiencing some heat waves – even though the news of the heat wave in London made all of us south africans smile, of course. “temperatures as high as 32c!”

i can’t say that i miss summer, at this point. truth is that we have had a pretty mild winter so far. some days i walk around my neighbourhood and it’s warm enough that people are donning shorts and tee-shirts. that’s just the way it is here, and always will be. i’m grateful for that. what i do miss is that feeling that summer brings – of being on perpetual holiday (even when you’re not). you can get home after work and there’s enough daylight left to go sit on the beach and have a sundowner with your friends, or jump in the pool, or have a gin & tonic on your patio… enjoy the next few months – it’ll be our turn soon.

all photos courtesy of their respective owners, please click on the images to be taken to the original.

© Able Parris

© Able Parris

© Violeta Niebla

© Violeta Niebla

© nikaela peters

© nikaela peters

© Jana Martish

© Jana Martish

© Alile Dara

© Alile Dara

© Gonzalo Sainz Sotomayor

© Gonzalo Sainz Sotomayor

© amanda jasnowski

© amanda jasnowski

© tatjana šuškic

© tatjana šuškic

© Molly Wizenberg

© Molly Wizenberg

© another feather

© another feather

© dream awake

© dream awake

© matt bower

© matt bower

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Olga Inoue

Olga Inoue is a teacher turned artist living in Moscow who creates many things including beautiful watercolours, hand-carved stamps, sweet objects & jewellery, delicate pottery and also lovely photographs.

my inspiration is nature, children, the way they see things and talk. their art. countries, weather, changing seasons. and words i hear from people, i’m very sensitive, so i can be moved easily, inspired by anything. *

you can find out more about her at her website and blog & you can also buy her work at etsy.












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Li Hui

continuing with Flickr Fridays! i have noticed and admired the work of Li Hui for years on Flickr, so I was surprised to find that i had never actually done a post about her before (cannot keep track after all these years i guess). she is a self-taught photographer who only uses film. something you might notice is that her subjects never show their faces, and she gives a reason for that in this interview:

My pictures never shows faces because I think this is a way of communicating with the viewer. The pictures remind us of our common feelings, secrets, past memories or magical dreams. The people in my pictures are not supposed to be unknown faces, but the viewer him- or herself.

browse her dreamy body of work at her website, tumblr and, of course, flickr.

all photographs by Li Hui.

5

Joni Sternbach

Joni Sternbach is a photographer from New York who specialises in the early wet plate collodion photographic technique. she has many beautiful projects to explore on her website, but the one that caught my eye was Surfland – where Joni documents surfers on the coasts of the US and Australia.

SurfLand is an ongoing project of contemporary portraits of surfers created using the historic wet-plate collodion process. The photographs are a unique blending of subject matter and photographic technique. Using the instantaneous wet-plate collodion process, I am creating one-of-a-kind tintypes that are imbued with a feeling of ambiguity, timelessness and mystery.

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Ren Rox

i thought it was great timing to show you the work of Ren Rox since Flickr has just been given a design update (and everyone gets 1 terabyte free storage, which is pretty cool). so now you can browse her work with lovely big pictures and endless scrolling – the way all photostreams should be viewed.

her photography has appeared in The Face, Lula, Dazed & Confused, Oyster, NME and many more publications. see more of Ren’s work at her website, flickr & tumblr.

all photos by Ren Rox

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Heidi Swanson

i am a huge fan of Heidi Swanson’s amazing food blog 101 Cookbooks – and i’m sure you are too – but i only recently discovered her beautiful photography (other than her food photography, of course). she is a super talented lady, with a new york times bestselling cookbook and wonderfully curated online shop Quitokeeto. check out more of her photos at flickr.

all photos by Heidi Swanson

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Dama and Dig

i was catching up on emails this morning after our internet-less weekend away and a wonderful letter from Anna Fusco was just so awesomely serendipitous & co-incidental, as i had literally just read this book and listened to this podcast.

both are stories of people who one day decided to hit the road and leave their ordinary lives behind – whether it was to go on a quest, or for no particular reason at all but to experience the open road… Anna & Nate are on the same path, having bought a thirty year old camper van and setting off on April 1st “with nothing but our cameras, our dog, the books we couldn’t bear to leave behind, and a new sleeping bag courtesy of my mother.” 

Since then, we’ve been traveling the U.S. without a calendar or a particular destination, living off of canned beans and tortilla chips. I’ve been religiously documenting every step of my wanderlust, the beauty and the breakdowns. Trust me that the van isn’t the only thing having an occasional meltdown. But that’s life, that’s van life, and I like it.

Everywhere we stop, people tell us they wish they could do what we do. I want people, women especially, to know that they CAN live in their VW campers and eat their cake too. I say women in particular because for some time it appeared to me that this was a seemingly male dominated “lifestyle,” attainable only by ex-professionals turned religious surfers (i.e. Foster Huntington, another big inspiration) – not by shrimpy twenty-something city girls too attached to their Swedish Hasbeens to “rough it” and too afraid of big waves to surf.

be sure to follow their adventures at Anna’s blog Dama and Dig. all photos by Anna Fusco.

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The Cowgirl Way

i love anything to do with cowgirls, so it was a treat looking through this recent New York Times feature about cowgirls of today who grow up in the ranch country of the Texas Panhandle. some of these girls appear quite tough (and i bet they are!) but then you spot the inconspicuous braid in their horse’s mane. photographer Ilona Szwarc is known for her series about American Girls, which you can see on her website.

When talking about rodeoing, the girls muse about their spiritual connection to the animals and the grit the sport helps them build — rather than the fact that they’re crossing over into traditionally male territory. “I used to be scared a lot, to even get on a horse,” Riley Sessions, 12, says. “I got tougher as I got on a horse and started riding. You’ve got to be pretty brave to ride a horse.” – Julie Bosman

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