still life

Emily Ferretti

i love the cool hued work of Aussie artist Emily Ferretti. she is represented by the Sophie Gannon Gallery. these pieces also appear in her book!

Ferretti’s oil-on-linen paintings of plants, rocks, domestic settings, sporting ephemera and architectural details are remarkable for their lightness of touch and subtleties in process, tonality and mark making, sidling the representational and abstract via a quiet, poetic tenor. Isolated from wider narrative and context, her various fragmentary scenes – athletic tracks, skate ramps, pot plants or winter forest scapes – work to bestow the day-to-day with a particular gravity and significance.

Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti Emily Ferretti

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Nasturtiums

if there’s one thing i will always remember about my mom’s garden, and perhaps my childhood in general, was the abundance of nasturtiums. this humble little flower seemed to grow in every garden in south africa – a bit of a weed, really. almost a lowly little bloom. i remember it having a peculiar smell, but possibly my favourite thing about it was its beautiful round leaves that would catch dew drops in the morning – and you’d carefully ease them off onto your tongue, pretending to be a bird.

i’ve noticed them a lot these days, becoming popular again, being used in floral arrangements and styled into photoshoots. i’m happy for the nasturtium! if anything it has been rendered immortal in the artwork of some of the greats. i can only imagine that they were as abundant for the artists in their day as they were in my mom’s garden.

Félix Vallotton

Abbott Fuller Graves

Gustave Caillebotte

Henri Fantin-Latour

Paul Gauguin

Henri Fantin-Latour

Odilon Redon

Félix Vallotton

Gustave Caillebotte

Félix Vallotton

Henri Matisse

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Fruitland

in September photographer Alison Zavos curated a collection of photographs of fruit for a show called, well, Fruitland. she searched hundreds of photographers’ websites and chose the “freshest, strangest still life photos” to present at Photoville – a pop up exhibition space made up of freight containers at Brooklyn Bridge Park in NYC. you can see more photos here.

Maybe as a response or antidote to the labored and moody Dutch still life-inspired fruit photography that has been proliferating in galleries over the past decade, young photographers are now challenging themselves to take a regular piece of fruit and make it special – adding their own strange twist to something so commonplace that anyone can pick it up at the local grocery store. This fascination with photographing fruit in the studio has spread far and wide. Fruitland includes 31 photographs from 18 international photographers.

above: Daniel Stier

above: Athos Burez

above: Florent Tanet

above: Aron Filkey & Mate Moro

left: Daan Brand | right: Aron Filkey & Mate Moro

above: Catherine Losing

above: Maciek Pozoga

left: Federico Ciamei | right: Nico Krijno

above: Maryanne Casasanta

above: Wyne Veen

above: ECAL/Maxime Guyon

above: Gilda Davidian

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Floralia

Artsy is fast becoming one of my favourite daily internet check-ins. i’ve discovered so many artists that i probably would never have known about otherwise thanks to it. besides the clean & beautiful design, i’m also quite taken by the fact that you can log in and favourite pieces as you go down the Artsy rabbit hole.

Artsy’s mission is to make all the world’s art accessible to anyone with an Internet connection. We are an online platform for discovering, discussing, and collecting art. Our growing collection comprises 30,000+ artworks by 6,000+ artists from leading galleries, museums, private collections, foundations, and artists’ estates spanning diverse cultures and time periods.

as an art / gallery / museum lover it’s such a treat to have something like this at my fingertips. i thought i’d do a series of art-related posts to share my Artsy finds, instead of doing just one big visual dump. first up, some floral inspiration (as last week’s post is still in my mind).


Sharon Core

Jeffrey Ripple

Amir H. Fallah

Susan Headly van Campen

Bruce Cohen

Georges Braque

Jane Freilicher

Daniel Gordon

Maurice Scheltens and Liesbeth Abbenes

Emil Nolde

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TEN & Co.

you’ll remember the beautiful lookbook from shoemakers TEN & Co. that i shared last year. well, they have gone in a completely different direction to showcase their Spring 2013 collection! showing off their beautiful handmade shoes in sumptuous table settings of food & drink, reminiscent of the still life paintings from Dutch golden age artists like Pieter ClaeszWillem van Aelst, Jan Davidsz. de Heem and Willem Claeszoon Heda (to mention a few). be sure to check out the entire lookbook and read about the story behind these rad shoes.

photography by René Cervantes, styling by Alex Brannian and Tory Noll

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flora

photos of flowers can be a bit hum drum, especially if you’ve seen one too many macro shots… but this series of photographs is amazing, like little pieces of art.

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janet hill

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i enjoy janet hill‘s still lifes (… still lives? i still don’t know what the plural is)

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françois-emile barraud

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barraud was swiss. he worked in paris for a time during the 1920’s and painted mainly still lifes and portraits, including many double portraits featuring himself and his wife. he was one of 4 brothers who all painted or sculpted at one time or another. he suffered several periods of illness during his life and died of tuberculosis in 1934, at the age of 35.

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