vintage photography

Found, Revisited

i’m so glad to see that the National Geographic Found tumblr is still going since i first posted about it back when it launched in March. they have a ton of brilliant photos on there now (this one is especially notable). imagine being the Nat Geo staffer who gets to go through the archives and update the blog – dream job! i especially love the bright kodachrome looking shots, they make me feel like going on holiday with a film camera and snapping some of my own.

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Found

National Geographic have set up a tumblr called National Geographic Found, to celebrate their 125th anniversary, where they’ll be sharing photos from their archives – many of which have never been seen before.

FOUND is a curated collection of photography from the National Geographic archives. In honor of our 125th anniversary, we are showcasing photographs that reveal cultures and moments of the past. Many of these photos have never been published and are rarely seen by the public. We hope to bring new life to these images by sharing them with audiences far and wide. Their beauty has been lost to the outside world for years and many of the images are missing their original date or location.

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Mark Shaw

you’re probably familiar with the work of fashion & celebrity photographer Mark Shaw, who was especially well known for his collection of photographs of the Kennedys. he shot over 100 stories in his 16 year career with LIFE magazine in the 1950s & 60s, and was one of the first photographers who documented backstage fashion at couture shows like Balmain and Balenciaga. if you’re feeling flush you can buy limited edition original prints of his work from the Andrew Wilder gallery. Here are some of my favourite stories he covered.

Audrey Hepburn

Portraits for LIFE Magazine of Hepburn while filming Sabrina. This entire shoot had lingered forgotten for more than fifty years in a box at the home of Mark’s first wife and were rediscovered in 2008. Initially Audrey Hepburn did all she could to avoid Mark Shaw’s cameras. When she realized they shared intense devotion to their work, she began to treat him like a member of the family.

Jackie Kennedy & family

These images were taken for an assignment from LIFE magazine about Jackie Kennedy which ran in 1959 while JFK was making his White House run. In the late 1950′s and early 1960′s Mark Shaw worked extensively as the “unoffical” family photographer to Jackie and John F. Kennedy.

Coco Chanel

Chanel was quoted at the time as saying that “Shaw had crept as close to her as anyone is likely to get with their LEICA on”. Shaw’s informal, grainy, black and white images of Chanel were captured using an unobtrusive 35 mm camera and film processing methods that enabled him to eliminate all other photographic equipment. The result is a highly personal and intimate look into a day in the life of this iconic woman.

Various artists - PicassoChagall, Fernand Leger & Miro

backstage at Balmain, 1954

various fashion editorials photographed in St. Tropez, Paris, Portofino

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Marianne Breslauer

i rediscovered this series of photographs taken between 1929 – 1934 by german photographer Marianne Breslauer thanks to lauren’s pinterest. i’m strangely envious of these women who are long gone.

Marianne was a close friend of the Swiss writer and photographer Annemarie Schwarzenbach, whom she photographed many times. She described Annemarie (who died at the young age of 34) as: “Neither a woman nor a man, but an angel, an archangel” * … From an early age she began to dress and act like a boy, a behaviour not discouraged by her parents, and which she retained all her life—in fact in later life she was often mistaken for a young man. *

Lisa von Cramm, Berlin, 1934

Annemarie Schwarzenbach, Zürich, 1934

Ruth von Morgen, Berlin, 1934

Ruth von Morgen

Ruth von Morgen, Berlin, 1933 & Jutta Zambona-Remarque

Annemarie Schwarzenbach

Annemarie Schwarzenbach

Annemarie Schwarzenbach

Annemarie Schwarzenbach

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Vintage Summer Snapshots

i’m really trying to psyche myself up for summer. if you follow my ramblings on twitter (or, of course, if you know me personally) you’ll know that i am not the hugest fan of this particular season. it’s the heat, you see. i think i might literally be allergic to heat. i can’t sit in the sun without going a lovely shade of blotchy red. i can’t even sit in a hot room without getting intensely uncomfortable. and the thing about living in south africa is that our summers are HOT. hot hot hot.

other than all that i really enjoy summer, of course. who doesn’t like long beautiful days, outdoor barbeques, walking on the beach, drinking ice cold beers in the sun, eating ice cream really quickly before it melts…

so in an effort to get the summer psyching going i did that guest post on hila’s blog as a jumping off point, then i started making a mood board dedicated to summer on pinterest (laugh at me if you will, but addiction is a serious matter) and now i am sharing some vintage summer snapshots – in colour. what better way to capture the season?

- courtesy of superbomba

- courtesy of bill greene

- courtesy of what makes the pie shops tick?

- courtesy of the snapatorium

- courtesy of phillip capper

- courtesy of etienne du plessis

- courtesy of superbomba

- courtesy of what makes the pie shops tick?

- courtesy of willy wilson

- courtesy of aroid

- courtesy of midwestern femme

- courtesy of lynne’s lens

- courtesy of anna allen

to all of you entering autumn soon – i really do envy you.

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Wet Plate Portraits by Dan Carrillo

i did a little dance in my chair when i discovered the Wet Plate Collodion Portraits by Daniel Carrillo. Dan is a photographer and printmaker from Seattle who has taken close to 100 portraits of people in the Seattle area arts community using the wet collodion method – a photographic process which was invented in the mid 19th century. be sure to watch Patrick Wright’s video below to see Dan talking about the project and explaining the process behind these amazing photographs. check out Dan’s Flickr stream and also visit his blog.

all photographs by Daniel Carrillo

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