vintage photography

Vintage Summer Snapshots

i’m really trying to psyche myself up for summer. if you follow my ramblings on twitter (or, of course, if you know me personally) you’ll know that i am not the hugest fan of this particular season. it’s the heat, you see. i think i might literally be allergic to heat. i can’t sit in the sun without going a lovely shade of blotchy red. i can’t even sit in a hot room without getting intensely uncomfortable. and the thing about living in south africa is that our summers are HOT. hot hot hot.

other than all that i really enjoy summer, of course. who doesn’t like long beautiful days, outdoor barbeques, walking on the beach, drinking ice cold beers in the sun, eating ice cream really quickly before it melts…

so in an effort to get the summer psyching going i did that guest post on hila’s blog as a jumping off point, then i started making a mood board dedicated to summer on pinterest (laugh at me if you will, but addiction is a serious matter) and now i am sharing some vintage summer snapshots – in colour. what better way to capture the season?

– courtesy of superbomba

– courtesy of bill greene

– courtesy of what makes the pie shops tick?

– courtesy of the snapatorium

– courtesy of phillip capper

– courtesy of etienne du plessis

– courtesy of superbomba

– courtesy of what makes the pie shops tick?

– courtesy of willy wilson

– courtesy of aroid

– courtesy of midwestern femme

– courtesy of lynne’s lens

– courtesy of anna allen

to all of you entering autumn soon – i really do envy you.

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Wet Plate Portraits by Dan Carrillo

i did a little dance in my chair when i discovered the Wet Plate Collodion Portraits by Daniel Carrillo. Dan is a photographer and printmaker from Seattle who has taken close to 100 portraits of people in the Seattle area arts community using the wet collodion method – a photographic process which was invented in the mid 19th century. be sure to watch Patrick Wright’s video below to see Dan talking about the project and explaining the process behind these amazing photographs. check out Dan’s Flickr stream and also visit his blog.

all photographs by Daniel Carrillo

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the dead photog project

i think it goes without saying how much i love the dead photographers project

Deadphotographers is a forever expanding collection of images which explore the relationship of photography and our changing time while aiming to prove the theory that everyone has a good photograph in them. The project is curated by James Dodd, a UK based photographer, who uses his father’s removals company as the only source of discovering the photographs.

Each photograph is collected through house clearances of the deceased, where unwanted items are discarded, including whole photography archives of the once keen photographers. The experience, skills and styles of the photgraphers range vastly. But with most there is a sense of love of their subjects and of the activity they once pursued.

Most collections are cared for, dated and ordered to some level, and kept securely, only to see them quickly discarded along with other once loved trinkets as soon as they pass. If they didn’t become part of this collection, they would simply be disposed of and never see the light of day again.

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john olson

john olson was hired by life in 1968 at the age of 21, making him the youngest staff photographer at the magazine. before that he went to vietnam at the age of only 19 and won the robert capa gold medal for his coverage of the battle of hue, one of the bloodiest battles of the war. you may recognise his photographs of rock stars and their parents.

all images courtesy of life mag

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charis wilson

charis wilson was a model & writer best known as the subject of photographer edward weston

wilson on the first time she met weston:

“For anyone interested in statistics – I wasn’t – he was 48 years old and I had just turned 20. What was important to me was the sight of someone who quite evidently was twice as alive as anyone else in the room, and whose eyes most likely saw twice as much as anyone else’s did.”

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