vintage photos

Matisse: Animal Lover

if you live in London or you’ve visited there any time in the past 4 months you should already have gone to see the Matisse Cut-Outs exhibition that’s currently showing at the Tate. if you haven’t, then i’m reminding you to. why? because i can’t go. do it for me! take a pic and tag me on Instagram! i would LOVE that. it’s only on for another 2 weeks or so, so you’d better go.

and just to reinforce my love for Matisse even more, here are a set of charming photos of him with various animals. an animal lover and an incredible artist. what a rad human being he was. all images courtesy of Tate.

Matisse: Animal Lover
Matisse: Animal Lover
Matisse: Animal Lover
Matisse: Animal Lover
Matisse: Animal Lover
Matisse: Animal Lover
Matisse: Animal Lover
Matisse: Animal Lover

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Humans of Cape Town

today i was preparing to do a follow up to my Bygone Cape Town post from a few years back (be sure to check it out) when i went down a rabbit hole and discovered, to my delight, the archives of Bobby Graham whose father took photos of ordinary people in Cape Town from 1959 to 1963. by the end of it i had the biggest grin on my face, he really had a gift for capturing the natural sense of a person. thanks to his daughter for uploading & sharing.

see the entire set here.

People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town
People of Cape Town

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Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats

when i was a kid i did ballet (which was short lived) and modern dancing. i was not good at either, but it was one of the few extra-mural exercise focused activities that i didn’t totally hate, and even though i have never been the most athletic person i at least had some rhythm (more so when i have had a few drinks – granted) so i just kept doing it cause it was fun. at some point it became no fun, mostly because the other girls were simply better than me, and my modern dancing teacher remarked that i was “the most inflexible person she’s ever taught”. which, as a kid, STUNG. i can barely touch my knees, let alone my toes, so yeah i am completely fucking inflexible – you don’t need to tell me that, lady!

anyway all those memories came streaming back when i saw these pictures taken by Hans Wild for LIFE Magazine at a school for acrobats, Gymnase Saulnier, in Paris, 1947. i haven’t been able to find any more information on it, but i am assuming the instructor is one Monsieur Saulnier. i bet he would have done something about my inflexibility instead of chiding me for it (okay, maybe a little bit of chiding). if anyone can shed any light on these photos, please do!

edit: Thank you to Sophie for finding out more information! she commented,

Le Père Saulnier was called the “girls breaker” because he was really strict with his students. You can see that the front door in the last picture is still in Paris, it’s in the 16 rue Véron. I found this information on this website (in french). They say that the main actress learn gym with him ! (and that this film is terrible, except for the gym part…)

Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats
Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats
Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats
Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats
Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats
Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats
Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats
Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats
Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats
Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats
Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats
Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats
Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats
Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats
Gymnase Saulnier, School for Acrobats

10

Girl Pilots

here are some bad-ass women to inspire you this Friday, who flew in the face of convention (pardon the pun) and trained as airforce pilots in 1943. despite the magazine describing them thusly, “girls are very serious about their chance to fly for the Army, even when it means giving up nail polish, beauty parlours and dates for a regimented 33 weeks.” can you even. you can read the original article in LIFE magazine here.

photos by Peter Stackpole for Life Magazine in 1943.

Girl Pilots Girl Pilots Girl Pilots Girl Pilots Girl Pilots Girl Pilots Girl Pilots Girl Pilots Girl Pilots Girl Pilots Girl Pilots Girl Pilots Girl Pilots

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Vintage Black Glamour

Nichelle Gainour, a journalist who blogs and writes for various online and offline publications, owns a tumblr called Vintage Black Glamour that has progressed into a book, launching in June. the tumblr is unique in that it’s not just pictures pictures pictures, something i find quite frustrating about themed tumblrs in general. she talks about the subjects in the photographs at length, something that i really appreciate in the land of the never ending out-of-context image (aka the internet).

i love this image of Loïs Mailou Jones, an artist who studied at Harvard and Columbia, pictured in her Parisian studio. there are many more where that came from – i suggest you delve into the archives.

Using rarely accessed photographic archives and private collections, Nichelle has unearthed a revealing treasure trove of memorable and iconic images. The book presents historic photographs of famous actors, dancers, writers and entertainers who worked in the 20th-century entertainment business, but who rarely appeared in the same publications as their white counterparts. With its stunning photographs and insightful biographies, this book is a hugely important addition to Black history archives.

pre-order the book here. the images in this post are both from the book and the tumblr.

Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour Vintage Black Glamour

8

Bike Girls

growing up my older brothers had motorbikes, and i thought it was soooooo cool. sometimes they would pick me up from school on one of these tanks and i would feel like like such a bad ass. granted i was not the one steering the motorbike, and i never have had the guts to actually ride one. so whenever i see a woman on a motorbike i think damn, girl. that’s what i thought when i saw these pics of women motorcyclists from 1949, taken by Loomis Dean for Life Magazine. and in an age when it might have been strange to see woman in pants – let alone riding motorbikes – they are pretty bad ass in my book.

images c/o Life Magazine photographed by Loomis Dean.

Bike Girls Bike Girls Bike Girls Bike Girls Bike Girls Bike Girls Bike Girls Bike Girls Bike Girls Bike Girls Bike Girls Bike Girls Bike Girls

 

5

Women in Science

you may remember this post that i shared a few years ago showing women artists from the collection of The Smithsonian. i decided to delve into their archives again, and discovered this set of Women in Science that they shared in honour of International Women’s Day.

Since 2009, the Smithsonian Archives has posted groups of photographs showing women scientists and engineers at work; women trained in science and engineering who worked outside the laboratory as librarians, writers, political activists, or in other areas where their work informed or was informed by science; family research collaborators who assisted their scientist husbands and fathers; and several images for which we have little descriptive information to which we invite you to contribute!

Anesia Pinheiro Machado c/o The Smithsonian

Brazilian aviation expert and pilot Anesia Pinheiro Machado (1902-1999) was the first person to obtain a U.S. commercial pilot’s license with additional ratings as instructor and for flying on instruments only. She had made her first solo flight in 1922, at the age of 18 and was the first Brazilian woman to make a cross-country flight.

Emma Reh c/o The Smithsonian

Emma Reh  (1896-1982) a journalist who reported on archaeological excavations in Mexico, as well as the social and political situation in that country. Later she worked at the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization, writing about food consumption and distribution problems.

Bertha Parker Pallan c/o The Smithsonian

Bertha Parker Pallan (1907-1978) is considered one of the first female Native American archaeologists.

Anna Vesse Dahl c/o The Smithsonian

Anna “Vesse” Dahl accompanied her husband Odd Dahl on expeditions, a Norwegian adventurer who had no formal scientific training but later made great contributions to research on atomic energy.

Lucile Quarry Mann c/o The Smithsonian

William M. Mann was Director of the National Zoological Park. His wife, Lucile Quarry Mann (1897-1986) often accompanied him on collecting trips. A science writer, Lucile Mann would produce the popular accounts of their expeditions. She also became skilled at care of exotic animals, feeding and caring for animals on expeditions and raising several big cat cubs in their home.

Dena Evelyn Shapiro c/o The Smithsonian

Dena Shapiro was a graduate student in anthropology at the University of Chicago. This photo describes her as just having traveled “to Palestine, to see how the new cloth of Zionism is fitting into the old garment of the complex Moslem-Christian-Jewish life there.”

Ethel Grace Stiffler c/o The Smithsonian

Ethel Grace Stiffler was a botanist who studied at Goucher College (A.B., 1922) and University of Pennsylvania

Anna Chao c/o The Smithsonian

Anna Chao Pai (b. 1935) was a predoctoral student in the Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, working on developmental genetics and cross-breeding special strains of mice.

Winifred May de Kok c/o The Smithsonian

South African born writer and broadcaster Winifred May de Kok (1893-1969) had attended medical school in England during the 1920s and was in medical practice until 1953, when she became a television broadcaster, engaging in discussions of family life and health on her BBC program Tell Me, Doctor.

Mary Knight Dunlap c/o The Smithsonian

Mary Knight Dunlap (1910-1992) was the founder of the Association for Women Veterinarians.

Ruth Colvin Starrett McGuire c/o The Smithsonian

Ruth Colvin Starrett McGuire (1893-1950) was a plant pathologist known for her work on sugar cane diseases.

15

Body Movin’

i don’t know about you guys, but this time of year is kinda awful. not only do we all have to go back to work (sigh) but some of us have probably gained a few kilos over the festive season (i read this post yesterday which made me feel a lot better about that fact) and the media enjoy drumming it into our brains that we must now shed this holiday weight and become our optimal physical selves in 2014. when i think about making new years resolutions to lose weight or get fit my eyeballs roll so hard into the back of my head that i can almost see into the past when i made that resolution exactly a year ago.

as a non-sporty girl, someone who is so hopeless at team sports it’s just laughable, i quickly began to hate physical exercise as soon as i was forced to partake in throwing a ball at school. consequently i never learned to love running around and reaping the benefits thereof. as an adult i realised hey, shit, i actually have to do this otherwise i might die - so i dabbled in the occasional running program and exercise video and pilates class. and i do enjoy it once i get into it, i really do, but it’s the staying in it that’s the hard part for me. forming new, good, habits is not easy when you’re simultaneously attempting to bat away the bad ones (and kind of really actually enjoying the bad ones).

so i’m trying to motivate myself to get into it, and keep at it. part of that is downloading a lot of excellent workout music (more on that later), bookmarking a shit ton of healthy recipes via that healthy recipe treasure trove that is Pinterest and… looking at fitspo tumblr blogs? erm, no. that stuff is so insane. don’t even get me started. rather, i’m going to look to the past for visual exercise inspiration. before we were tainted by pics of thigh gaps and motivational quotes.

pics via this great post on ilPost, and the LIFE photo archives.

Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin' Miss Moss // Body Movin'

 

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