weaving

New Friends

i briefly featured the work of NYC based New Friends, aka Alexandra Segreti and Kelly Rakowski, last year - but i thought they deserved their own post because their work is just soooooo good. they were also featured in the UO blog last month and i just loved seeing a little tour of their studio.

New Friends design and produce weavings, textiles and housewares. They weave unique objects that combine the rich history of textiles and contemporary visual culture. The fibers used in their vivid, oddball collections range from locally sourced, plant dyed wools to man-made metallic threads.

photography c/o New Friends, studio images c/o the UO Blog, photographed by Jody Rogac.

New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends New Friends

 

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Voices of Industry

Adele Stafford is the creative mind behind Voices of Industry, who create hand woven apparel and textiles from 100% domestic fiber, farmed and spun in the U.S. Adele hand weaves each piece on a mechanical loom from her studio in Oakland, California and works with a small team of pattern makers and tailors in San Francisco. which is pretty amazing if you consider that almost 98% of all clothing in the US is made internationally. it’s people like Adele & her team who are steadily bringing that number down (and creating beautiful garments at that).

We consider the farmers that produce our cotton and wool as co-conspirators and friends. We invest in the independent grower, the bio-dynamic alchemist and the punk rock shepherdess. We know that cloth is a direct extension of agriculture and we care, deeply, about that origin. We strive to make exceptional cloth, hand woven on a mechanical loom and finished by skilled pattern makers and tailors. Our process is time consuming and choreographic and we believe that this is evident in our foot-treadled twills and french seams.

their first collection was inspired by Sally Fox, farmer, breeder and pioneer of the organic, naturally colored cotton that we used to weave each piece of this collection. Photographed by Brian Ferry in Oakland and Capay valley, California with assistance from Valeda Beach Stull. Pattern making and cut + sew by Danielle Colen. Modeled by Afton Love. Muslin jumpsuit + white kimono dress courtesy of Small Trade Company. Grey wool skirt by Ali Golden.

Voices of Industry Voices of Industry Voices of Industry Voices of Industry Voices of Industry Voices of Industry Voices of Industry Voices of Industry Voices of Industry Voices of Industry Voices of Industry Voices of Industry Voices of Industry Voices of Industry Voices of Industry

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Kustaa Saksi

i am quite transfixed by the trippy weavings of Finnish designer & artist Kustaa Saksi, who manufactured the collection, called Hypnopompic, using the Jacquard weaving technique. the weavings are made of mohair, alpaca wool, cotton and metallic acrylic thread.

Hypnopompic refers to a state of sensory confusion leading out of sleep, when the state of awakening gets mixed with the dream world into a surreal reality. It is an exceptional state of consciousness, in which one may experience the presence of, or see creatures and animals, such as spiders, monkeys and insects. Hypnopompic state has also been affiliated with visual delusions caused by migraine. These graphic patterns, designs and textures are thought to have contributed to the traditions of ornamentation, mosaic and textile.

Kustaa Saksi // Miss Moss
Kustaa Saksi // Miss Moss
Kustaa Saksi // Miss Moss
Kustaa Saksi // Miss Moss
Kustaa Saksi // Miss Moss
Kustaa Saksi // Miss Moss
Kustaa Saksi // Miss Moss
Kustaa Saksi // Miss Moss
Kustaa Saksi // Miss Moss
Kustaa Saksi // Miss Moss
Kustaa Saksi // Miss Moss
Kustaa Saksi // Miss Moss
Kustaa Saksi // Miss Moss
Kustaa Saksi // Miss Moss
Kustaa Saksi // Miss Moss

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Tuokka by Katja Mustaniemi

Katja Mustaniemi is a creative designer from Finland who designed the Tuokka backpack as part of her final thesis at the Lahti Institute of Design and Fine Arts. it is such a beautiful piece, and i absolutely loved seeing her entire design process on her website. now the question is, where can we buy one?

Inspiration for this work came from deep down – from my childhood in Finnish forests and growing up in scandinavian functionality. I studied the technique of birch bark (basket) weaving and designed and made a backpack with attachable pockets. The pockets also function as additional compartments or separate handbags, and are sized for modern everyday objects like a smartphone and a tablet. Easy and durable closure is created by using magnets and snap fasteners. Material used is recycled leather. My goal was to reproduce a functional and aesthetic product which brings the traditional and historically important craft into the present.

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Doug Johnston

you will probably recognise artist Doug Johnston’s beautiful coiled rope work from around the internet (those pendants and the incredibly sought after baskets most specifically). he has just launched a lookbook for a new range of bags, shot by Brook&Lyn. i just LOVE that backpack.






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Native Line

i’ve noticed a popular resurgence in hand weaving the past while, especially in the realm of wall hangings. i’m sure you’ve seen beautiful tapestries featured on design blogs (the stunning work of Brook&Lyn comes to mind) or cropping up on pinterest. if you’re a fan, like me, then you can add another talented artist to your most wanted weavers list – Justine Ashbee.

with a background as a fine artist known for her intricate pen drawings, she recently expanded her talents into woven pieces, wearable jewelry, hanging light sculptures and wall hangings – all of which stem from her early explorations in weaving metal sculptures as a textiles student. she collects her work and inspirations on her website Native Line.

Native Line consists of one off woven pieces, wearable jewelry, hanging light sculptures, & wall hangings, all of which stem from her early explorations in weaving metal sculptures, as a textiles student, at the Rhode Island School of Design. Inspired by the timeless motifs of indigenous woven craft work, Justine combines geometric lines with shimmering metals, to create luminary pieces of woven art, whether for your wall, or to wear as every day statement pieces.

you can buy Justine’s handwoven wall hanging objects at her online shop.

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