winter

Tony Chestnut FW14

the rad thing about the blog is that often after i’ve discovered and posted about the work of talented people it allows us to connect and keep in touch – so i’m kept in the loop whenever something new is on the horizon (good for me, and good for you!) one such person is Jill Sawatzky of Tony Chestnut who i posted about earlier this year. she just released her FW14 collection, available at her online shop.

This newest collection was inspired by my Mennonite ancestors, and their humble way of living off the land. Subtle Androgyny, utilitarianism, simplicity and modesty were paramount in the inspiration. I love combining the creativity of handmade clothing, with the contrasting notion of necessity and frugality that drove people like my grandmother to sew and produce. It’s always been the backbone of tony chestnut to try to embody and respect both of these ideas in my handmade clothing.

photography by Meg Kroeker, who uses unedited film which she processes herself.

Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14
Tony Chestnut FW14

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À Capucha!

wow there seems to be some seriously cool stuff coming out of Portugal lately. i recently featured Portuguese brands SUL and Nomad, now À Capucha! is the latest to add to that list. i mean, something that has an exclamation mark in its actual name has to be good, right? right!

À Capucha! is recreating the capucha, a traditional Portuguese garment, used by shepherds and farmers. the brand forms part of design consultancy Estufa, and was born to explore the convergence of design and manufacturing.

The “Capucha” is a traditional Portuguese garment, used by shepherds and farmers. it is made of burel (100% wool) and is impermeable. Our capuchas are handmade by the artisans of remote villages, who still have secrets and unique ways of manufacturing. In this project, we commit ourselves not to let the portuguese artisanal techniques disappear, by contributing to a sustainable production and by protecting a heritage that makes us unique and timeless.

they have a beautifully designed website & online shop – go check it out!

À Capucha!
À Capucha!
À Capucha!
À Capucha!
À Capucha!
À Capucha!
À Capucha!
À Capucha!
À Capucha!
À Capucha!
À Capucha!
À Capucha!
À Capucha!
À Capucha!
À Capucha!

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La Casita de Wendy: Sisterhood

designers Inés and Iván of La Casita de Wendy have just launched their new collection Sisterhood at Paris Fashion Week. the entire collection has been produced by traditional artisans & craftsmen in their native Spain, using natural fabrics such as wool, silk and cotton. for this collection they also worked with natural dyes for some of their handmade scarfs. that huge patchwork scarf in the first picture is un. real. also love that beautiful thick embroidery and of course that lush illustrative dress.

Our new collection is inspired on XIX century women such as Lizzie Siddal, Georgie Macdonald, Effie Gray, Jane Morris or Julia Prinsep. They were models, writers, painters, actresses,… and they also played a role as muses of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. They all shared the same original ideas about life and lived as outsiders in a very male society dominated by a very strict point of view and narrow traditions. This is the way in which we wanted to honour all these mysteriouswomen who were part of one of the most important European art movements. It is also a homage to all the women who had lived in the shadows.

Photos: Elena Grimaldi. illustrations: Ana Sender + Pablo Padilla. embroidery & accessories:  Lanusa

La Casita de Wendy La Casita de Wendy La Casita de Wendy La Casita de Wendy La Casita de Wendy La Casita de Wendy La Casita de Wendy La Casita de Wendy La Casita de Wendy La Casita de Wendy La Casita de Wendy La Casita de Wendy La Casita de Wendy

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Take Care

Take Care is a Cape Town based label by designer Jessica Harwood. their winter collection suits my taste for beautiful pared down pieces. i went into their shop on Kloof Street recently, shared with menswear label Adriaan Kuiters, and man-handled (woman-handled?) some of the beautiful coats. i am particularly taken by the double waterfall jacket below. also happy to tell you that you can now peruse Take Care at their online shop – glad to see more and more South African designers selling on the web.

lookbook photos shot by Julia Merrett.

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nido

i know i complain about our endless summers a plenty – it’s not the sunshine that gets me, it’s just the heat guys! i revel in the short winter months where i get to wear stockings and scarves and coats and things made from wool. i must admit though, it never gets that cold. i don’t think i have worn gloves in south africa more than a handful (…) of times in my entire life. that does not mean i wouldn’t buy a pair. it would probably just end up sitting in a drawer all sad and lonely, waiting for the cold.

if that day ever comes i would definitely not mind rocking a pair of wool gloves from argentinian label nido (i would also like one of those peach jerseys, please). their pieces are handknitted with 100% sheep wool which is “made from a women cooperative located in Mary Grande, a village near of Paraná, Entre Ríos. they shear their sheep, produce the fleece, spin them by hand on wooden distaff and dye the wool with colors extracted from nature: blackberry, onion, locust bark, eucalyptus leaves.

visit their website & tumblr. first image by ana armendariz.
















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Charlotte Linton A/W 2012

Charlotte Linton hits it straight out of the park again with her A/W 2012 collection

The travel diaries of early 20th century artist Rockwell Kent provide a starting point for designer Charlotte Linton’s Greenland Collection. Taking inspiration from the paintings and drawings Kent created whilst living amongst Inuit communities, Charlotte blends her usual mix of landscape, wildlife and culture with Kent’s exuberant colour palette in her eclectic printed scarf collection.

This season, Charlotte’s fictional muse Ermantrude follows in Kent’s footsteps arriving in Nuuk Greenland to undertake a cross-country expedition. Under the glow of the Northern lights, Ermantrude learns of Greenlandic mythology, the traditional crafts of the Inuit and their ingenuity with fur, and listens to the song of the Bowhead Whale.

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