Art

Eugène Séguy: Insectes

just gonna file this under coolest things ever. these are illustrations by French entomologist Eugène Séguy, from a book detailing his illustrations of insects and colourful decorative compositions of their patterns and colouring dating from 1925. he was, understandably, more well-known for his brilliant pattern design than for his work as an entomologist – though the two are undeniably intertwined. read more about him here.

Eugene Alain Seguy was one of the foremost French designers at the beginning of the 20th century. Working in both the Art Deco and Art Nouveau styles, he published many design folios utilizing the pochoir technique, a printing process that employs a series of stencils to lay dense and vivid color. *

images c/o the Beineke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, part of the Yale University Library. you can actually download the entire catalog in PDF form.

Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes Eugène Séguy: Insectes

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365 Postcards for Ants

Lorraine Loots is an artist based in Cape Town who wrapped a highly successful project called 365 Paintings for Ants at the end of 2013. as you can guess from the title, Lorraine painted a tiny painting every day for 365 days and, well, you have hopefully seen that scene which explains the name.  she posted a painting every day on Tumblr and Instagram (where you can browse all 365 paintings in the archive). most of the time the subject stemmed from her own imagination, but as it gained momentum people booked dates that were special to them and commissioned paintings, like this portrait of Ron Swanson painted for a couple who got engaged after an episode of Parks and Recreation.

i enjoyed seeing such a talented person’s dedication to her work being celebrated in local blogs and magazines, and all over social media, and i wondered what Lorraine was going to do when she had finished. well, she’s not stopping. 365 Postcards for Ants is the next phase of the project, celebrating Cape Town in honour of it being the 2014 World Design Capital.

be sure to read this wonderful interview by Lior Phillips to learn more about Lorraine and her work. you can follow the new project on her Instagram & Tumblr and you can also book a painting if you’d like to own one of these tiny delights.

paintings c/o Lorraine Loots. video by Gareth Pon. photographs by Frances Marais for MBLife.

Lorraine Loots // Paintings for Ants

Lorraine Loots photographed by Frances Marais Lorraine Loots photographed by Frances Marais Lorraine Loots photographed by Frances Marais

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Tata Naka x Matisse

i LOVE Matisse. see evidence of my massive adoration for him here. so when i saw this exceptional Matisse inspired AW 14/15 pre-collection by talented twin sister design duo Tata Naka, i could not help but do a mash up.

Tata-Naka is designed by Georgian-born identical twins, Tamara and Natasha Surguladze. They arrived in London in 1996 to study design at Central St Martin’s and in 2000 Barneys NYC dedicated a wall to their awe-inspiring graduation collection. The Tata-Naka statement pieces regularly starred in the legendary series ‘’Sex in the City’’ and were worn by Carrie Bradshaw on the cover of the official book.

you can see the entire collection here. images c/o courtesy of Tata Naka. Henri Matisse clippings c/o Wikipaintings.

Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss Tata Naka // Miss Moss

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Helen Frankenthaler

today i’m inspired by the work of legendary abstract expressionist Helen Frankenthaler. her huge colourful paintings look like gigantic watercolours, but are in fact painted with oils & acrylics. Helen would work directly on unprepared canvas, and dilute the oil paint with turpentine (later she switched to acrylic paint), causing it to soak into the canvas – a technique called “soak stain” that was later adopted by other abstract expressionists like Jackson Pollock. her work was not highly gestural and painterly, instead she preferred to create pieces that looked as if they were “born in a minute”.

A really good picture looks as if it’s happened at once. It’s an immediate image. For my own work, when a picture looks labored and overworked, and you can read in it – well, she did this and then she did that, and then she did that – there is something in it that has not got to do with beautiful art to me. … I think very often it takes ten of those over-labored efforts to produce one really beautiful wrist motion that is synchronized with your head and heart, and you have it, and therefore it looks as if it were born in a minute.

What concerns me when I work, is not whether the picture is a landscape, or whether it’s pastoral, or whether somebody will see a sunset in it. What concerns me is – did I make a beautiful picture?

Helen was born and raised in New York, and was celebrated in the NYC art scene since her debut in the 50s.  she produced work until her death in 2011 (you can read her obituary at the New York Times), and apart from her painting she also created lithographs, etchings, screen prints and woodcuts. you can see her work at many institutions across the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, MOMA, the Guggenheim and the Centre Pompidou in Paris.

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Gordon Parks for Life Magazine

photographed by Gordon Parks for Life Magazine, 1956

Basque Beach, 1958 by Helen Frankenthaler

Basque Beach, 1958

Summer Scene Provincetown, 1961 by Helen Frankenthaler

Summer Scene Provincetown, 1961

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Ernst Haas
Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Ernst Haas

photographed in her studio by Ernst Haas

Flood, 1967 by Helen Frankenthaler

Flood, 1967

Tutti Fruitti, 1966 by Helen Frankenthaler

Tutti Fruitti, 1966

Helen Frankenthaler, photographer unknown

photographed by by Alexander Liberman

Nepenthe, 1972 by Helen Frankenthaler

Nepenthe, 1972

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by William Grigsby

photographed by William Grigsby in her home, 1967

Untitled, 1965 by Helen Frankenthaler

Untitled, 1965

Helen Frankenthaler by Alexander Liberman

photographed by Alexander Liberman

Persian Garden, 1965 by Helen Frankenthaler

Persian Garden, 1965

Portrait of Helen Frankenthaler in front of woodblock proofs for Essence Mulberry, 1977

Helen Frankenthaler in front of woodblock proofs for Essence Mulberry, 1977 photographed by Lindsay Green

Helen Frankenthaler Lithographs at MOM

lithographs in the collection of MOMA

Helen-Frankenthaler-Alexander-Liberman

in her studio by Alexander Liberman

Small Paradise, 1964 by Helen Frankenthaler

Small Paradise, 1964

Helen Frankenthaler by Michael Fredericks

photographed by Michael Fredericks

Snowpines, 2004 by Helen Frankenthaler

Snowpines, 2004

Helen Frankenthaler, Painted on 21st Street

Painted on 21st Street

Untitled, 1963 by Helen Frankenthaler

Untitled, 1963

Helen Frankenthaler, photographer unknown

photographed by Alexander Liberman

Indian Summer, 1967 by Helen Frankenthaler

Indian Summer, 1967

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Dan Budnick

Helen Frankenthaler photographed by Dan Budnick

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Pepa Prieto

i am fascinated by the work of artist Pepa Prieto, who was born in southern Spain, went to boarding school in England and now lives and works in New York. she has quite a varied body of work stemming from 2005 to now, but something i find consistently beautiful are those brush strokes that seem to coil their way through her pieces.

The paintings are small fragments of my universes, virtual landscapes, jungles of vegetation, ritual objects, memory embodied in physical objects, emotional constructions, human rituals, patterns and colors from memory- things seen from the inside out.

see a selection of her work at her website. all images & quote courtesy of Pepe Prieto.

Artist: Pepa Prieto Artist: Pepa Prieto Artist: Pepa Prieto Artist: Pepa Prieto Artist: Pepa Prieto Artist: Pepa Prieto Artist: Pepa Prieto Artist: Pepa Prieto

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Lynnie Zulu

browsing the vibrant work of London based illustrator Lynnie Zulu is the perfect antidote to a Monday. growing up in Scotland, drawing was a form of escapism from an early age and much of her work draws from her family’s Tanzanian heritage. also the cursor on her website is a watermelon… it doesn’t get much more cheerful than that. you can buy some of her prints at Ohh Deer and Deer Brains, and original work at Art Wednesday.

Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu
Lynnie Zulu

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Miso

Stanislava Pinchuk aka Miso is a Ukrainian born artist based in Melbourne whose prolific body of work includes paper art, illustration and tattooing (amongst others). i’m one of those people who has never considered a tattoo (i suppose if i were to get one i would have one by now, you know?) but her delicate, simple & imperfect home-made tattoos are so beautiful to me. she even published a guide to home-made tattooing. other notable works include commissions for Chanel and a paper-cut series called Tokyo From Memory.

Miso began making work firstly as a street artist, but has since come to work mainly as an exhibiting artist, working with paper and installation. Her practice also spans illustration, tattooing, photography, textile & graphic design. Her works are often ephemeral, and play with ideas of place & memory, particularly of cities – a left over from a long time making street works to decay. *

you can see all of Miso’s work at her website & tumblr.

Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso Miso

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Kristina Krogh

Kristina Krogh is a Danish graphic designer and artist who combines different materials and their surfaces to create fascinating designs that you can buy as prints. you can see more & purchase at her online shop.

I think the strong mix of these exclusive and cheap textual materials such as marble, ply, wood, cork and paper is an interesting an unexpected combination that I love. My inspiration comes from the things and objects that surrounds me; a beautiful old parquet, a perfect color combination on a building, a stone floor in a church, a bike ride through Copenhagen – among many other things.

Kristina Krogh Kristina Krogh Kristina Krogh Kristina Krogh Kristina Krogh Kristina Krogh Kristina Krogh Kristina Krogh Kristina Krogh Kristina Krogh Kristina Krogh Kristina Krogh Kristina Krogh Kristina Krogh Kristina Krogh

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